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Anna Masutti and Filippo Tomasello

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Anna Masutti and Filippo Tomasello

The increasing civilian use of Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UASs) is not yet associated with a comprehensive regulatory framework, however new rules are rapidly emerging which aim to address this shortfall. This insightful book offers a thorough examination of the most up-to-date developments, and considers potential ways to address the various concerns surrounding the use of UASs in relation to safety, security, privacy and liability.
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Frans G. von der Dunk

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Frans G. von der Dunk

The scholarly contributions discussed in this timely research review address the special realm of legal rules applicable to space activities and their terrestrial applications. Outer space is generally considered a “global commons”, so this review focuses on the international regime which is also the foundation of an increasing number of national space laws. Topics covered concern the development, character and structure of international space law, its relationship with national space law, and military and commercial aspects of space activities, including launching and satellite applications. This fascinating study provides a comprehensive overview of the most important matters relating to international space law and will be a valuable research tool for academics and practitioners alike.
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Frans G. von der Dunk

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Frans G. von der Dunk

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Daniel P. Murray

This chapter details the performance-based regulatory framework for space transportation developed by the US Federal Aviation Administration Office of Commercial Space Transportation (FAA AST). The aim of the framework adopted by the FAA AST is to ensure the protection of the public, property and the national security and foreign policy interests of the United States during commercial launch or re-entry activities, and it encourages, facilitates and promotes US commercial space transportation. In fulfilling its safety mission FAA AST grants a licence or a permit to a launch vehicle operator based on the operator’s demonstration that it has met the applicable requirements of the US Code of Federal Regulations. Given the success of this approach, the FAA AST has recently started undertaking international cooperation efforts to assist other administrations in developing a similar approach. Keywords: commercial space transportation; US federal law: safety; international cooperation

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Edited by Jan Wouters, Philip De Man and Rik Hansen

Commercial Uses of Space and Space Tourism combines the perspectives of academics, policy makers and major industry players around three central themes connected to commercial spacefaring: the international legal challenges posed by the dramatic changes to the spacefaring landscape through privatisation and commercialisation; the corresponding legal and regulatory responses to these challenges at the national level; and related topical questions of global space governance.
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Jan Wouters, Philip De Man and Rik Hansen

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Armel Kerrest

Although we have long moved on from a spacefaring environment dominated by the actions of two State powers, modern space law is still centred on the notion of ‘launching States’, including as the basic concept for applying the Liability Convention. This chapter asks whether the legal framework established at the time of adoption of the Liability Convention is still efficient for the regulation of commercial space ventures, in particular by questioning the continuing relevance and definition of the concept of ‘launching State’. This question will be considered in four steps, discussing in turn (1) the importance of the notion of launching States; (2) the interest of holding States liable for damage caused by a space object; (3) the implications of private entities getting involved in this framework; and (4) the entity carrying the risk created by private space activities. Keywords: launching State; liability; private actors