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Edited by Barney Warf

The Handbook on the Geographies of Corruption offers a comprehensive overview of how corruption varies across the globe. It explores the immense range of corruption among countries, and how this reflects levels of wealth, the centralization of power, colonial legacies, and different national cultures. Barney Warf presents an original and interdisciplinary collection of chapters from established researchers and leading academics that examine corruption from a spatial perspective.
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Varieties of Capital Cities

The Competitiveness Challenge for Secondary Capitals

David Kaufmann

The political and symbolic centrality of capital cities has been challenged by increasing economic globalization. This is especially true of secondary capital cities; capital cities which, while being the seat of national political power, are not the primary economic city of their nation state. David Kaufmann examines the unique challenges that these cities face entering globalised, inter-urban competition while not possessing a competitive political economy.
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David Kaufmann

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Nicola Francesco Dotti

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Edited by Nicola F. Dotti

This book provides theories, experiences, reflections and future directions for social scientists who wish to engage with policy-oriented research in cities and regions. The ‘policy learning’ perspective is comprehensively discussed, focusing on actors promoting ‘policy knowledge’ and interaction among different stakeholders. The book also aims to provide practical insights for policy-makers and practitioners interested in research-based approaches to cities and regions.
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Nicola Francesco Dotti

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B. Guy Peters

Making public policy is difficult. Richard Coyne (2005) argues that confronting ill-defined and awkward problems that are, in essence, wicked problems is the norm for policymaking, and that being able to deal with well-defined and rational policymaking is the exception. If that is at all an accurate depiction of the nature of contemporary policymaking then we need to invest heavily in understanding these problems if we are going to be able to cope with policy design, whether as academics or as practitioners. The preceding chapter provided a discussion of policy problems from a somewhat general perspective. In this chapter I will focus on a particular class of problems that have been referred to as “wicked”, “messy”, “complex”, or “intractable”. While, as Coyne points out, decision-makers should be careful in expecting any policy problem to be simple, or “tame”, clearly some problems are still more difficult than others. While many of the same principles of design may be applied to wicked problems, they also require some very careful attention and differentiated strategies if policy designers are to be effective in coping with them.

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Chan S. Jung

This chapter examines whether the framework suggested and empirically validated with U.S. federal programs in Chapter 8 is valid in different contexts. Two quantitative analyses are conducted in the contexts of South Korean central government agencies and English local government authorities. They commonly demonstrate that goal ambiguity mediates the relationships of management capacity, organizational size, and work complexity with performance. Furthermore, the South Korean case additionally offers evidence supporting the mediated-moderation relationship, in which higher political insulation enhances the negative effect of management capacity on goal ambiguity, which in turn relates negatively to performance. The English case does not validate the moderation effect of political insulation.

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Chan S. Jung

There was at least a thirty-year gap between the beginning of anecdotal and theoretical arguments and the beginning of quantitative research, regarding predictors of goal ambiguity. There could be diverse reasons for such a long time difference. This chapter briefly discusses complications for goal ambiguity research in public organizations. Then it provides a broad and thorough literature review of empirical goal ambiguity studies in public management and policy. The review is systematically divided into public–private comparison, predictors, consequences, and mediation effects of goal ambiguity. Most of the quantitative studies were about organizational goal ambiguity. After the literature review, the need for program goal ambiguity research is discussed, followed by conceptual and methodological issues for the program-level research.

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Chan S. Jung