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Edited by Eran Vigoda-Gadot and Dana R. Vashdi

This Handbook comprehensively explores research methods in public administration, management and policy. Exploring the richness of both traditional and contemporary methods and strategies for making progress in the field, it provides an advanced toolkit for understanding the science of public administration and management in the 21st century.
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Mikael Sundström

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How Not to Write a Thesis or Dissertation

A Guide to Success through Failure

Mikael Sundström

If you thought a book about thesis writing would make for wearisome reading, think again! In seven entertaining and enlightening chapters, Mikael Sundström sheds light on the trials and tribulations of academic writing, offering guidance on how to become a doyen of academic disaster – and, more importantly, how to avoid that fate.
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Mikael Sundström

In this introductory chapter, the aims and ambitions of the book are set out and explained.

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Mikael Sundström

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Edited by B. Guy Peters and Guillaume Fontaine

Public policy research has become increasingly comparative over the past several decades, but the methodological issues involved in this research have not been discussed adequately. This Handbook provides a discussion of the fundamental methodological issues in comparative policy research, as well as descriptions and analyses of major techniques used for that research. The techniques discussed are both quantitative and qualitative, and all are embedded in the broader discussion of comparative research design.
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Edited by Nicolina Montesano Montessori, Michael Farrelly and Jane Mulderrig

This book provides a series of contemporary and international policy case studies analysed through discursive methodological approaches in the traditions of critical discourse analysis, social semiotics and discourse theory. This is the first volume that connects this discursive methodology systematically to the field of critical policy analysis and will therefore be an essential book for researchers who wish to include a discursive analysis in their critical policy research.
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The citation approach to journal ranking

Perceived Benefits versus Unintended Consequences

Imad A. Moosa

Research output is evaluated by a combination of quantity (the number of research articles published) and quality, where quality is typically measured by the status of the journal in which the research is published. The citation-based approach (also called the citational approach and bibliometric method) has become the dominant method used to rank journals, reflecting in part the increasing availability of citation data. For all practical purposes, citation analysis began with the publication of the Science Citation Index (SCI) in 1961. Measuring journal quality by citation indices is questioned on the grounds that citations do not necessarily reflect impact. Although a long list of arguments can be presented against the use of citations, the citation approach is less subjective than other approaches to journal ranking.

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Consequences of POP: Research misconduct

Perceived Benefits versus Unintended Consequences

Imad A. Moosa

POP has been found to be detrimental to the health and well-being, and a threat to the job security and livelihood, of academics. In response to the challenge posed by POP, a tendency has arisen to indulge in research misconduct that takes various shapes and forms. Misconduct includes misappropriation of ideas, plagiarism, self-plagiarism, impropriety of authorship, failure to comply with legislative and regulatory requirements, violation of generally accepted research practices, falsification and fabrication of data, failure to support validation of research, and inappropriate behaviour in relation to suspected misconduct. One indicator of the rising incidence of misconduct is the high frequency of paper retraction.

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Consequences of POP: Research quality and dissemination of knowledge

Perceived Benefits versus Unintended Consequences

Imad A. Moosa

A consequence of the POP culture has been the proliferation of published research at a rate that is disproportional to the advancement of human knowledge. However, most of the published work goes unnoticed even by fellow academics. The POP culture has adverse consequences for the quality of published research, and it impedes the discovery process. Furthermore, the POP culture Slows down the dissemination of knowledge, drives a wedge between published research and reality, makes research findings unreliable and biased, and introduces bias against research from developing and non-English speaking countries and against non-article publications. POP also has an adverse effect on non-research activities, including teaching and community service.