Browse by title

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 1,071 items :

  • Research Methods in Business and Management x
Clear All
You do not have access to this content

The way forward

Perceived Benefits versus Unintended Consequences

Imad A. Moosa

The way forward is to abandon the POP culture, which is a product of neoliberal market ideology according to which universities should be held accountable for the amount of scholarly output they produce, as measured by the quantity and quality of publications. According to this ideology, universities should be run like private enterprises because the provision of private goods, such as education, should be governed by the market mechanism. The implication here is that universities should be left on their own, without public funding, and that they must generate income from teaching, automated or otherwise, and from contract research. In this case, academic staff will be under pressure to bring students or perish (for the teaching staff) and bring in research money or perish (for the research staff). The way forward is to go back to days gone by, prior to the emergence of the destructive ideas associated with Reaganism-Thatcherism.

This content is available to you

VISUAL METHODOLOGIES

Theory and Applications

Professor Alexandros Paraskevas

You do not have access to this content

Assistant Professor G. Christopher Crawford and Professor Bill McKelvey

Life is not normally distributed – we live in a world of extreme events that skew what we consider ‘average.’ The chapter begins with a brief explanation of the basic causes of skewed distributions followed by a section on horizontal scalability processes. These are generated by scale-free mechanisms that result in self-similar fractal structures within organizations. The discussion then focuses on one of the most cited mechanisms purported to cause power law distributions: Bak’s (1996) ‘self-organized criticality’. Using three longitudinal datasets of entrepreneurial ventures at different states of emergence, the chapter presents a method to determine whether data are power law distributed and, subsequently, how critical thresholds can be calculated. The analysis identifies the critical point in both founder inputs and venture outcomes, highlighting the threshold where systems transition from linear to nonlinear and from normal to novel. This provides scholars with a conceptual–empirical link for moving beyond loose qualitative metaphors to rigorous quantitative analysis in order to enhance the generalizability and utility of complexity science.

You do not have access to this content

Dr Robin Durie, Dr Craig Lundy and Professor Katrina Wyatt

A number of drivers for contemporary research are focusing attention on how to achieve public engagement in research undertaken by Higher Education Institutes (HEIs). In 2008, RCUK funded six ‘Beacons for Public Engagement’. We sought to understand how each Beacon had created the conditions for two-way engagement in the research design and delivery. We undertook an initial scoping study of the organisational culture within each Beacon and, using maximum variation sampling, selected seven projects which were our case studies. The analysis of the findings from these case studies from a complex systems perspective led us to conceptualise an ‘engagement cycle' which has three phases or elements: creating the conditions; co-creation of research; and, feedback loops to inform ongoing and future research. In this chapter, we discuss the approach we used to gather the data, how complexity theory underpins the approach and the interpretation of the findings, and how the results led to the engagement cycle.

This content is available to you

Reviewers

Theory and Applications

Edited by Eve Mitleton-Kelly, Alexandros Paraskevas and Christopher Day

You do not have access to this content

The ranking craze: From journals to universities and departments

Perceived Benefits versus Unintended Consequences

Imad A. Moosa

The journal ranking craze has become international, spreading worldwide in the spirit of globalization. Journal ranking is the means to a big end, that of ranking universities, departments and disciplines for the purpose of allocating scarce funds. The link between research evaluation and journal ranking is that journal ranking is central to the evaluation of research. According to the OECD, 13 countries have been identified as using systems of ex post research output evaluation for the purpose of determining the distribution of government funding. These countries have been following the lead of the U.K., where research evaluation started in 1986 under the auspices of the Thatcher government. The overall range of indicators used by other countries is similar, but various combinations and weightings are employed.

This content is available to you

Publish or perish: Origin and perceived benefits

Perceived Benefits versus Unintended Consequences

Imad A. Moosa

‘Publish or perish’ (POP) is a phrase that describes the pressure put on academics to publish in scholarly journals rapidly and continually as a condition for employment (finding a job), promotion, and even maintaining one’s job. POP may be advocated on the grounds that a good track record in publications draws attention to the authors and their institutions, which can facilitate continued funding and the progress of the authors themselves. However, the POP culture also brings with it unintended adverse consequences that outweigh any perceived benefits. There is no consensus view on who actually coined the term ‘publish or perish’. The rise of the POP culture can be attributed primarily to the attitude of governments that look at higher education as a cost, not an investment, or those believing that it is not their job to fund education.

You do not have access to this content

Publish or Perish

Perceived Benefits versus Unintended Consequences

Imad A. Moosa

Imad Moosa’s thought-provoking book explores the contemporary doctrine that plagues the academic sphere: the principle of publish or perish. This book identifies the pressures placed upon academics to either publish their work regularly, or suffer the consequences, including lack of promotion, or even redundancy.
You do not have access to this content

Professor James K. Hazy and Professor Peter R. Wolenski

The chapter presents a general mathematical framework to study discontinuous change in human interaction dynamics. There are two complementary perspectives: macro and micro. Regarding the macro context, the chapter proposes that levels of ordered structure in complex human organizing can be represented by a category theoretic representation that reflects informational influence acting on individual agents from sources external to the population and those internal to the population. These independent influences interact to change the set of interaction rules that are enacted locally. Regarding micro context, the authors position contagion as the mechanism whereby a common organizing state is adopted across multiple agents. They show that as a general matter, the ordered structure that emerges within a population can be indexed as the number of active degrees of freedom embedded in local rules of interaction that are guiding groups of agents. Category theoretic mathematical approaches should be more used in social science research to suggest deductive hypotheses that can be tested empirically with definitive results.

You do not have access to this content

The peer-review process

Perceived Benefits versus Unintended Consequences

Imad A. Moosa

Peer review, which determines what does and does not get published, is so problematical that alternatives are being sought. Because of the problems associated with the process, journal ranking is too problematical to be useful. Peer review, which can be described as a stochastic process, has so many shortcomings, including methodological and ideological bias, bias against new ideas, confirmation bias, obsession with finding faults, reckless and dishonest practices, referee incompetence, lack of scrutiny, and delays. Several alternatives to the current per review practices have been suggested, including the cascading and portable peer review models. For all the problems associated with the practice, looking for alternatives to peer review is a matter that is taken seriously.