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Imad A. Moosa

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Imad A. Moosa

In this fascinating book, Imad A. Moosa challenges existing preconceptions surrounding normative economics, arguing that what some economists see as undisputed facts of life may be myths caused by dogmatic thinking. Plausible explanations are suggested for puzzles in various areas of economics and finance, such as the home bias puzzle, the PPP puzzle and the presidential puzzle. Controversies in Economics and Finance is a thought-provoking and stimulating read that exposes common flaws in economic analysis. It will be of great benefit to academics, graduate students and policy-makers looking to understand the limits of economic analysis.
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Imad A. Moosa

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Imad A. Moosa

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Antony W. Dnes

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Antony W. Dnes

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Antony W. Dnes

Teaching Essentials of Law and Economics provides an up to date and succinct account of the application of economic analysis to legal doctrines, institutions and legal reform.
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Edited by Trine Bille, Anna Mignosa and Ruth Towse

Teaching Cultural Economics is the first book of its kind to offer inspiration and guidance for teaching cultural economics through short chapters, a wide scope of knowledge and teaching cases by experienced teachers who are expert in the topic.
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John Mendeloff

This teaching note focuses on two common difficulties for students. The first is the failure to think in terms of marginal effects. Deciding whether something is worthwhile depends upon what other options are available. When confronted with a program that costs more than another but also has greater effects, students often don’t realize that they need to examine the marginal cost per marginal effect of the more expensive program relative to the other program. The second, related, difficulty is not realizing that, unless you have a value to place on the effects, you generally can’t say whether a project is worthwhile. Instead, students see that buying only one unit may provide a lower cost per unit than buying more units (assuming declining marginal effectiveness). Then they label that the most “cost-effective” option, and proceed to recommend that it be adopted. Several variations related to cost-effectiveness are discussed.