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Cities and Regions in Crisis

The Political Economy of Sub-National Economic Development

Martin Jones

This book offers a new geographical political economy approach to our understanding of regional and local economic development in Western Europe over the last twenty years. It suggests that governance failure is occurring at a variety of spatial scales and an ‘impedimenta state’ is emerging. This is derived from the state responding to state intervention and economic development that has become irrational, ambivalent and disoriented. The book blends theoretical approaches to crisis and contradiction theory with empirical examples from cities and regions.
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Martin Jones

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Edited by John R. Bryson, Lauren Andres and Rachel Mulhall

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Edited by John R. Bryson, Lauren Andres and Rachel Mulhall

This Research Agenda provides both a state-of-the-art review of existing research on city-regions, and expands on new research approaches. Expert contributors from across the globe explore key areas for reading city-regions, including: trade, services and people, regional differentiation, big data, global production networks, governance and policy, and regional development. The book focuses on developing a more integrated and systematic approach to reading city-regions as part of regeneration economics, identifying conceptual and methodological developments in this field of study.
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Nicola Francesco Dotti

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Edited by Nicola F. Dotti

This book provides theories, experiences, reflections and future directions for social scientists who wish to engage with policy-oriented research in cities and regions. The ‘policy learning’ perspective is comprehensively discussed, focusing on actors promoting ‘policy knowledge’ and interaction among different stakeholders. The book also aims to provide practical insights for policy-makers and practitioners interested in research-based approaches to cities and regions.
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Nicola Francesco Dotti

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Frank Mattheis

Delineating Africa as a region is a complex feat. Delineating regionalisms within Africa is all the more challenging. There are multiple fragmentations of Africa into sub-regions and most of them remain very porous and ambivalent. To contextualise these processes, this chapters starts by examining how pan-Africanism and the ideal of national sovereignty have defined African regionalism during the twentieth century. This is followed by an overview of the characteristics of both formal and informal forms of African regionalism as well as the respective logics that underpin their existence. Individual sections of this chapter are dedicated to three trends that result from the juncture of fragmentation and institutionalisation in African regionalism: overlapping regionalism, interregionalism and maritime regionalism. The chapter closes by outlining future avenues for research on African regionalism.

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Ivan Turok

The New Urban Agenda maintains that urbanisation in Africa is a one-off opportunity to restructure national economies, eliminate poverty and enhance environmental resilience. The key to unlock the transformative power of urban growth is a compact and connected spatial form that facilitates economic interactions, reduces infrastructure costs and protects surrounding ecosystems and biodiversity. This chapter reflects on whether these propositions accord with current evidence and understanding of urbanisation dynamics, encapsulated within four broad narratives. The simple conclusion is that a more integrated urban form would confer important economic and environmental advantages, but probably at the expense of equity and inclusion because buoyant land markets tend to displace low income groups. There are additional complications surrounding the political realities of anti-urbanism and the lengthy timescales required to transform urban trajectories.

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Klaus Dodds and Alan D. Hemmings

The Arctic and Antarctic have attracted their own distinct regional projects and expressions of regionalism. At a conceptual level, our discussion is informed by a desire to better understand how ‘territory’ and ‘region’ are put to work discursively and acted out and upon geopolitically. In the Polar Regions, in particular, the intersection of ice, rock and water is particularly distinct in terms of how territorial and regional management is expressed. Working off a volumetric, rather than areal, focus, recent work alerts us to how region-making projects have worked through height, depth and subterranean domains none more so than in the Arctic and Antarctic. It is also axiomatic that the regional boundaries of the Arctic and Antarctic are fluid so that it is imperative that we appreciate that regional and international actors such as the European Union (EU) and UN agencies such as the International Maritime Organization (IMO) play a part in shaping polar regionalism in the water, air, and on the land.