Browse by title

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 2,351 items :

  • Human Resource Management x
  • Business and Management x
Clear All
You do not have access to this content

Edited by Lize A.E. Booysen, Regine Bendl and Judith K. Pringle

Equality, diversity and inclusion (EDI) have become features of organizations as a result of both legal and societal advances, as well as neoliberal economic reasoning and considerations. Current research approaches frequently fall short of addressing the challenges faced in EDI research, and this benchmark Handbook brings up to date coverage of research methods in EDI, and advances the development of research in the field.
This content is available to you

Edited by Lize A.E. Booysen, Regine Bendl and Judith K. Pringle

This content is available to you

Monica Forret, Diana Smrt, Sherry E. Sullivan, Shawn M. Carraher and Jennifer L. Schultz

In this chapter, we feature several exercises that help students understand the value of HR/HRM: What it is, why it’s important, and the need for thinking of HR strategically. Importantly, several of these exercises have an artistic/visual component, which may aid in reorienting HRM from a policing/reactive function to one that is more strategic and proactive. One uses pictures that convey HR practices, while another asks students to draw a picture that represents the HR culture of their organization. There is also an exercise that makes use of a new approach to slide presentations throughout the semester. Groups are encouraged to create and deliver Pecha Kucha presentations (20 slides, automatically timed at 20 seconds each, for a total of six minutes and 40 seconds) on current events in HR. This activity encourages group members to operate as facilitators in ways that intensify deep thinking and engagement and, at the same time, requires students to be succinct and apposite.

You do not have access to this content

Teaching Human Resource Management

An Experiential Approach

Edited by Suzanne C. de Janasz and Joanna Crossman

Filled with over 65 valuable case studies, role plays, video-based discussions, simulations, reflective exercises and other experiential activities, Teaching Human Resource Management enables HR professors, practitioners and students at all levels, to engage and enhance knowledge and skills on a wide range of HR concepts. This book breathes life into the teaching of Human Resource Management and readers will be able to better relate theoretical concepts to workplace decisions and dilemmas.
You do not have access to this content

Anna B. Kayes, David M. Kaplan, Jane Burdett and Sharon L. O'Sullivan

Once employees have been hired, it cannot be assumed that they will flourish in their jobs. Job specifications – even ones that have been recently updated – will change as the competitive landscape changes, and employees’ skills need continually to be assessed, developed, and managed. How organizations develop their talents, especially in knowledge work environments, is key to organizational competitiveness: being able to compete in a constantly changing, global marketplace and ensuring employees continue to grow and develop in their careers. Featured among these exercises are one two which enable students to develop a training plan, another which requires critical thinking to discover what went wrong in such a process, and the first which takes a broad look at the war on talent.

You do not have access to this content

Lisa T. Stickney, Alexander L. A. Crossman, Joanna Crossman and Lydia Richards

In the U.S. alone, on average 13 employees die each day in workplace accidents. The industry which tops the list – construction – accounts for nearly 20 percent of workplace deaths. Ideally, workplaces are designed and maintained to be safe. However, workplace safety goes beyond construction accidents, or even the slip/fall common in food service. More work is done by knowledge workers, and with more employees spending increasingly more time at a computer, we are seeing a growing incidence of carpal tunnel syndrome and other issues related to the sedentary nature of work. Workplace safety, housed within Human Resources, is concerned with employees’ safety and well-being, and works to prevent and resolve safety-related issues. The exercises which follow will be of interest to faculty and students alike.

You do not have access to this content

David M. Kaplan, Julie Palmer, Katina Thompson, Susan Dustin, Christina Arroyo, Sanjeewa Perera and Robert D. Marx

Once a job is evaluated and designed the process for filling the position begins. Decisions to be made include: determining the labor needs both now and in the future, where to advertise the job, whether to look internally first, what kind of special considerations might be made, and the criteria for selection. While this may sound simple, there is a mountain of research that demonstrates biases – both conscious and unconscious – that get in the way of making the best selection decisions. Included in this chapter are several exercises that enable students to experience the challenges of hiring employees, including special cases where diversity, overqualification, and group roles in decision-making processes are potential issues.

You do not have access to this content

Edmund Chow, Julie Palmer, Phanikiran Radhakrishnan and Sunil Sookdeo

The new employees are hired, and they are working hard … but how effectively are they working? Perhaps one of the most important and difficult tasks of a manager is to give employees feedback on their performance. Much has been said about the fear of giving feedback, and this explains why it is delayed, done poorly, or avoided completely. Appraising performance requires great skill and can be used with a variety of approaches, some of which are the subject of the exercises which follow.

You do not have access to this content

Vicki R. Whiting, Maury Peiperl and Suzanne C. de Janasz

Whereas training is the focus of developing the skills of employees as individuals, organization development is all about helping an organization develop as it grows, matures, and even nears its end. A critical component of organizational development is leading and managing change – dealing with which is difficult for more humans. The first exercise focuses on change at the individual level; after all, if individuals can’t implement change on themselves, how can they model and lead change processes aimed at an organization full of people? The other exercises focus on organizational change and development.

You do not have access to this content

Carol Scott, Suzanne C. de Janasz and Joy Schneer

Over the last 30 years, the workforce has become more demographically diverse, which reflects changes in jobs and careers. No longer does an individual (person) join an organization out of high school or college and stay until s/he retires. Organizational researchers also note that the current work environment demonstrates how the psychological contract between an organization and its employees has changed: Employment is at the whim of the organization in its increasingly competitive environment, and employees (who are responsible for navigating their advancement) are more loyal to their profession than to an organization. They change jobs more often, share jobs, and work virtually. While traditionally, the HR organization watched over employees’ careers, employees – and by extension HR professionals – must develop the ability to network, seek mentors, and balance competing work/family roles – especially as they change over the life cycle. The diverse exercises included in this chapter provide ample opportunities to start this process.