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Clive Kerridge

Experiential learning - learning by doing - has long been advocated as an effective pedagogy for knowledge retention and soft skills development, with the role of reflection recognised as a key ingredient. Good business simulations are used successfully in many environments and professions, including Higher Education. They are often enjoyed by students and facilitate the three types of learning: effective, cognitive and behavioural. We look at the benefits to students and instructors of including business simulations within blended learning study programmes; which type of ‘sim’ to choose and when to use it; what to do (and what not to do!) to ensure simulations, and the associated experiential learning, contribute to student engagement and effective learning in a business school context.

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Edited by Kathy Daniels, Caroline Elliott, Simon Finley and Colin Chapman

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Learning and Teaching in Higher Education

Perspectives from a Business School

Edited by Kathy Daniels, Caroline Elliott, Simon Finley and Colin Chapman

There is often little guidance available on how to teach in universities, despite there being increasing pressure to raise teaching standards, as well as no official requirement for academics to have any specific teaching qualification in many countries. This invaluable book comprehensively addresses this issue, providing an overview of teaching in a business school that covers all stages of student learning.
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Edited by Kathy Daniels, Caroline Elliott, Simon Finley and Colin Chapman

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Competitive Accountability in Academic Life

The Struggle for Social Impact and Public Legitimacy

Richard Watermeyer

This book considers how a culture of ‘competitive accountability’ in UK higher education produces multiple tensions, contradictions and paradoxes that are destabilizing and deleterious to the work and identities of academics as research scientists. It suggests the potential of a new discourse of scientific accountability, that frees scientists and their public communities from the absurdities and profligacy of ‘performativity’ and ‘managerial governmentality’ encountered in the REF and an impact agenda – the noose of competitive accountability – and a more honest and meaningful public contract.
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Richard Watermeyer

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Richard Watermeyer

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Edited by Ruth Bridgstock and Neil Tippett

This book challenges the dominant ‘employability skills’ discourse by exploring socially connected and networked perspectives to learning and teaching in higher education. Both learning and career development happen naturally and optimally in ecologies, informal communities and partnerships. In the digital age, they are also highly networked. This book presents ten empirical case studies of educational practice that investigate the development of learner capabilities, teaching approaches, and institutional strategies in higher education, to foster lifelong graduate employability through social connectedness.
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Anne Vorre Hansen and Sabine Madsen

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Theorizing in Organization Studies

Insights from Key Thinkers

Anne Vorre Hansen and Sabine Madsen

While many books provide guidance to the construction of theory, the process of theorizing itself has been addressed far less. The aim of this book is to encourage researchers to reflect upon their subjective theorizing practices and to engage in dialogue about theorizing in organization studies. Drawing on interviews with eight key figures in the field, this book provides guidance for how to theorize, and how to do so well, using the key tools of the theorizers.