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Edited by John R. Bryson, Lauren Andres and Rachel Mulhall

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Edited by John R. Bryson, Lauren Andres and Rachel Mulhall

This Research Agenda provides both a state-of-the-art review of existing research on city-regions, and expands on new research approaches. Expert contributors from across the globe explore key areas for reading city-regions, including: trade, services and people, regional differentiation, big data, global production networks, governance and policy, and regional development. The book focuses on developing a more integrated and systematic approach to reading city-regions as part of regeneration economics, identifying conceptual and methodological developments in this field of study.
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Edited by Urban Gråsjö, Charlie Karlsson and Iréne Bernhard

Developed countries must be incredibly innovative to secure incomes and welfare so that they may successfully compete against international rivals. This book focuses on two specific but interrelated aspects of innovation by incumbent firms and entrepreneurs, the role of geography and of open innovation.
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Ossi Pesämaa and Martin Svensson

Principal–agency theory has influenced the formation of corporate boards worldwide. However, the viability of such an outsider-owned model has also been questioned. Weak empirical support between the structure of corporate boards and the performance of firms, and examples of bankruptcies in companies such as Enron, Lehman Brothers and Worldcom, raise doubts about the efficiency of boards. Many Asian countries are dominated by another type of model – insider governance models – relying on families and close relationships instead. Based on the central tenets of principal–agent theory and macro-level data (2006–14), we analyse differences in board efficiency between emerging economies in Asia and western economies. The findings unveil a ‘cultural effect’ where board efficiency better predicts the insider-orientated governance model that is prevalent in eastern economies. The viability of principal–agency theory as a unifying model is discussed, and then practical implications and recommendations for further research are outlined.

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Tobias Arvemo and Urban Gråsjö

This chapter investigates the importance of cross-border activities for border regions in Sweden. We acknowledge the heterogeneity between regions by dividing them into three categories depending on the population density on each side of the national border. A spatial model is estimated using data from 2014 that takes into account geographical proximity and spatial correlation. The model examines the difference in gross pay per inhabitant and employment rate between municipalities belonging to a border region and an average comparable Swedish municipality. The results show that the largest positive effect can be found for municipalities belonging to sparsely populated regions bordering a densely populated region. For municipalities in densely populated regions bordering a densely populated region comparable improvements are revealed, although not of the same magnitude. For municipalities in sparsely populated areas bordering rural areas, no statistically significant differences are discovered between them and the Swedish average.

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Globalization, International Spillovers and Sectoral Changes

Implications for Regions and Industries

Edited by Charlie Karlsson, Andreas P. Cornett and Tina Wallin

As a consequence of globalization, news, ideas and knowledge are moving quickly across national borders and generating international spillovers. So too, however, are economic and financial crises. Combining a variety of methods, concepts and interdisciplinary approaches, this book provides an in-depth examination of these structural changes and their impact. Assessing the implications of globalization for businesses and sectors, chapters focus on the interdependencies between different economic and political layers, and explore topics such as human capital, creativity, innovation, networks and collaboration.
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Charlie Karlsson, Andreas P. Cornett and Tina Wallin

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Trudy-Ann Stone

One of the most salient features of the modern economy is the globalization of production, and one key actor contributing to this development is the multinational firm. Understanding where multinational firms locate and how they operate is at the heart of academic disciplines such as international business and, more recently, international trade. An important factor shaping the location decision is the role of bilateral distance between the home and host countries. In particular, researchers have shown that cultural, institutional, geographical and economic distance between home and host countries all have a bearing on the firm’s location decision. However, ongoing developments call into question current understanding of the role of bilateral distance. This chapter reviews the literature on the effect of bilateral distance between the home and host countries on the location behaviour of multinationals, highlighting key areas for future research to address.

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Ola Olsson

This chapter is focused on how the information and communication technology (ICT) context has nourished the industrial dynamic literature stream when it comes to the innovation process. It does so by using a life-cycle approach on key node papers with a specific focus on interaction and collaboration activates between ICT firms during the past decades. According to the study these activities have nourished the process in different stages of the innovation life-cycle. In addition, choice of learning strategy seems to decide the strength of relationships and ultimately the potential magnitude of innovation and technological change. The practical implication is that ICT firms seem to have moved away from the vertical strategy of doing it all in-house. Instead, there are several indications of an open way of working which push the innovation process forward.

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Nino Javakhishvili-Larsen, Andreas P. Cornett and Martin Klatt

In recent decades, European neighbouring regions have gained importance in the processes of spatial integration within the European Union. Based on the European Cohesion goals, cross-border cooperation among institutions supports the socio-economic development of the regions and enhances equality across Europe. In order to study cross-border institutional cooperation, this chapter develops a conceptual model of cross-border institutional thickness (CBIT) and tests its applicability on the case study of the Rhine-Waal region (NL-GE). It is explorative research, based on the Interreg IVA project database. The chapter focuses on institutions, cross-border initiatives and policies, and contributes to the body of empirical evidence on the issue. A set of social network analysis techniques are applied to measure the CBIT model and unfold some facts about cross-border interactions among institutions by means of Interreg projects in the Rhine-Waal region.