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Gama Perruci and Sadhana W. Hall

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Gama Perruci and Sadhana W. Hall

The last chapter of this book includes the reflections of the two co-authors on how to move forward as educators and pave the path for continued learning about leadership studies. It emphasizes key takeaways from the previous chapters. Readers will find different aspects of the book more valuable depending on their individual interests and level of experience and maturity in developing and implementing leadership programs. This chapter lays out the priorities that should inform all educators when teaching leadership.

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Gama Perruci and Sadhana W. Hall

In this chapter, we explore the intellectual development of leadership studies (e.g., the empirical study of leadership, the development of a leadership canon, leadership as a discipline) as a way to suggest different paths that educators might take in developing a leadership curriculum. There is no single formula for developing a rigorous curriculum to expand students’ knowledge of how leadership works. Academic strengths of educators as well as an institution’s traditions may influence the types of courses that are integrated into a leadership program. These choices must provide students with a deeper understanding of the concepts and literary contributions of the leadership canon. Every leadership program obviously will have a different history and reality that will shape the curricular choices that are made. The key to a vibrant leadership curriculum is to be intentional and rigorous in curricular development.

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Gama Perruci and Sadhana W. Hall

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Gama Perruci and Sadhana W. Hall

This chapter is designed to introduce educators to the interdisciplinary connections that have given rise to leadership studies. While many leadership programs trace their roots to student affairs offices, the current academic study of leadership is often housed in various academic departments. The chapter begins by engaging the reader in this question about the interdisciplinary teaching of leadership: Is it a dialogue of disciplines or a pedagogical tool for understanding human relations? Next, the chapter reviews the different approaches that educators have taken to advance the teaching of leadership, including pre-professional, liberal-arts, and topic-based programs. The chapter ends with a discussion about the dynamic of finding an academic home for leadership studies.

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Gama Perruci and Sadhana W. Hall

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Gama Perruci and Sadhana W. Hall

Leadership development is deeply personal. Part of the leadership development experience is to recognize that there is no easy way to become a successful leader, and that leaders require a certain level of humility. Practical wisdom is gained by developing the habits of doing the right thing in the right way at the right time through experience. Learners need to be able to understand the choices they make and the consequences of the decisions they take. This chapter includes examples of activities educators can use for creating an environment in which their learners can gain practical wisdom and highlights a few program strategies that develop leadership capacities in learners when working with others. Finally, the chapter examines the role of failure in gaining practical wisdom.

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Gama Perruci and Sadhana W. Hall

This chapter offers brief descriptions of programs from two institutions that can be adopted, adapted, or adjusted. The intention behind this chapter is to share program designs and activities and provide a space for reflection on how these activities may translate into others’ own institutional reality. The examples provided in this chapter give educators a wide variety of activities that can be generated through careful consideration of students’ maturity and developmental stages. For example, in some cases, programs are intentionally targeted to first-year students and help them transition to a higher level of learning beyond high school. In other instances, programs focus on seniors as they prepare to make the transition out of college.

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Gama Perruci and Sadhana W. Hall

This chapter focuses on educators’ self-reflection. It begins by detailing the self-awareness, cultural, and technical competencies educators must first cultivate in themselves, so they may model the values, attitudes, and behaviors the program seeks to develop in its learners. Leadership educators in curricular and co-curricular programs need to continually assess their leadership presence, understand their audience, and strive to demonstrate congruence between values and behavior. The chapter presents strategies for using self-awareness to create an optimal learning environment. The chapter begins with a discussion of what is meant by self-awareness, and then presents examples of how a number of educators have cultivated this awareness and effectively applied it in shaping their learning environments. Leadership educators must continually evaluate their effectiveness in creating an emotionally, socially, and intellectually supportive space for their learners.

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Gama Perruci and Sadhana W. Hall

Excellent leadership programs are developed through rigorous attention to detail. Well-designed sessions convey the educator’s dedication to the material and respect for the learners’ time and effort. Put simply, by intentionally crafting and organizing each session, educators communicate a devotion to doing things right, which puts them well on their way to establishing trust, credibility, and respect as stepping-stones to leadership. This chapter begins with a general overview of the components of effective session design as follows: assessing audience maturity level and readiness; establishing SMART learning outcomes; identifying key concepts; incorporating leadership categories and competencies; outlining content and roles; and creating time for reflection. With a session design in place, the chapter focuses on logistical considerations for its implementation, including some tools used for organizing sessions within a program.