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Bryan Sanderson

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Carlos Cavallé

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The Home

Multidisciplinary Reflections

Edited by Antonio Argandoña

In the first major work to take the home as a center of analysis for global social problems, experts from a variety of fields reveal the multidimensional reality of the home and its role in societies worldwide. This unique book serves as a basis for action by proposing global legislative, political and institutional initiatives with the home in mind.
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Antonio Argandoña

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Justine Lloyd

This chapter examines a series of recent incidents in Australia during which mobile phone footage of racialized abuse has been circulated online and then taken up by mainstream media news outlets. These incidents highlight the ways in which structural racism underpins the possibility of being at home in Australia for some groups and not others. Indeed, this chapter argues that this kind of practised racism rests on exclusionary notions of home, which create capacities for certain social actors to constrain others’ mobilities. I argue that understanding tensions within these definitions of home is key to understanding practices of mediated mobility and how they play out in travelling publics. Keywords: uncivil attention, racism, public space, public transport, mediated mobilities, listening practices, Australia

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Evelyn Honeywill

The Internet and the perpetual state of connectivity that it supports are an indispensable part of late modern infrastructure from which no domain of society remains untouched. The home is one domain undergoing transformation. In what is often termed postindustrial society, the home has come to operate as a space in which everyday private and public activities converge via the network, a domain in which individuals, institutions and markets assume common residency, routinely engaging in exchanges reflective of a postindustrial service economy. As the author argues here, these dynamics can be productively conceptualized with the term ‘the postindustrial home’. With this concept the author opens up and situates the home as a transformed and evolving sociological space from which further and new sociological inquiry can stem. Keywords: postindustrial society, postindustrial home, home, sharing economy, private sphere, connectivity

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Yasmine Musharbash

The last 100 years have seen Warlpiri people experience drastic changes in ways of being in the world, from a hunting and gathering past, followed by violent frontier days and ensuing institutionalized sedentization in government settlements, to community life in the era of self-determination, and on to contemporary times of intensive policy intervention. In this chapter, the author explores some of these changes by focusing on one aspect of them, Warlpiri experiences of home. She examines these in turn by contrasting three different examples across time: 1) Warlpiri notions of home as country during the hunting and gathering past; 2) Warlpiri experiences of home in houses of the Yuendumu community during the time of self-determination; and 3) the experiences of the here and now of intense policy intervention. On the one hand, these examples illustrate an easily assumed progression of life ‘outside’ in the desert, via the yards of colonial houses, to the ‘inside’ of contemporary suburban-style housing. On the other hand, the author shows how the inside/outside dichotomy veils other values crucial to understanding Warlpiri notions of home. Keywords: sleep, domestic space, home, phenomenology of space, Aboriginal Australia

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Jeff Browitt

Contemporary masculinity is constructed, performed and maintained through all kinds of symbolic practices and rituals. One recent kind of symbolic practice or expression is ‘man caves’ or ‘man spaces’, a certain kind of domestic space dedicated to and inhabited by primarily heterosexual men in spousal relationships: converted garages, basements, sheds, spare rooms and so forth. These spaces usually involve the storage of favourite objects, including cars and car parts, motorcycles, tools, collectibles and memorabilia, musical and gym equipment, televisions, home theatres, alcohol paraphernalia, weapons, books, games and so forth. Man caves function for building, repairing and maintaining ‘stuff’, as entertainment centres, as ‘toys’, as an escape into solitude or, conversely, as a place to entertain friends, a place to express oneself in another way or a place to let one’s imagination run free. They are a key site for reading the performance of contemporary, urban masculinity. Within the confines of the domestic sphere, man caves promise control over a space, its décor and the socialisation therein. Keywords: masculinity, home, man caves, vernacular museums, material culture

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Aleksandra Ålund, Carl-Ulrik Schierup and Lisa Kings

Contemporary welfare state restructuring in Sweden has led to increased ethnic and residential segregation in larger cities but also to urban unrest. Following violent youth rebellions in the Swedish suburbs a plurality of new dialogue-oriented activist groups have emerged among youth, profiled as ‘urban justice movements’. They represent a grassroots mobilization that interconnects spatial segregation with social (in)justice, racism and welfare transformation in Swedish cities. The authors discuss agency, claims and the meaning of home-making among two generations of activists in multi-ethnic Swedish suburbia. They argue that the emergence of new urban justice movements as a public voice expresses politics in the making, relating the local with the national and connecting rights to the city with rights to home and belonging. Keywords: segregation, home, urban justice movements, youth, welfare state, citizenship

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Edited by Justine Lloyd and Ellie Vasta