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Stephan Klasen

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Anne Trebilcock

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Stephan Klasen

This impressive research review discusses the most important contributions by some of the leading scholars in the field of poverty measurement. It analyses what constitutes poverty and associated poverty measures, as well as conceptual and empirical approaches to set poverty lines for both national and international settings. The papers discussed in this research review also discuss national and international income poverty measures, multidimensional poverty indices, and ways to capture poverty dynamics.
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Stephan Klasen

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Anne Trebilcock

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Anne Trebilcock

This comprehensive research review discusses an array of distinguished papers from within the sphere of comparative labour law, covering the subject’s most compelling and thought-provoking questions. Topics include the uses and limits of comparative labour law, the enforcement of labour rights and the methods of comparative labour. This review promises to be a useful research tool for scholars and practitioners, as well as a fascinating read for those interested in the field.
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Stephan Klasen

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Anne Trebilcock

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Servaas Storm

Milton Friedman's presidential address to the American Economic Association holds a mythical status as the harbinger of the supply-side counter-revolution in macroeconomics – centred on the rejection of the long-run Phillips-curve inflation–unemployment trade-off. Friedman (seconded by Edmund Phelps) argued that the long run is determined by ‘structural’ forces, not demand, and his view swept the profession and dominated academic economics and macro policymaking for four decades. Friedman, tragically, put macroeconomics on the wrong track which led to disaster: secular stagnation, rising inequality, mounting indebtedness, financial fragility, a banking catastrophe and recession – and no free lunches. This is Friedman's legacy. We have to unlearn the wrong lessons and return macroeconomics to the right track. To do so, this paper shows that Friedman's (and Phelps's) conclusions break down in a general model of the long run in which productivity growth is endogenous – aggregate demand is driving everything again, short and long.

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David Laidler

Friedman's presidential address was about ‘The role of monetary policy’. Its famous discussion of inflation–unemployment interrelationships was subservient to this broader topic. The program it promoted influenced monetary policy in the 1970s and early 1980s with mixed results, but enough of it survived to be a clearly visible influence on today's inflation-targeting regimes.