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Yahong Li and Weijie Huang

The past three centuries have witnessed copyright owners competing with distributors for the flow of income generated by new technologies. However, users have largely been excluded from this cake-cutting copyright game. The neglect of users’ interests has posed a serious challenge in the user generated content (‘UGC’) age. New technologies have empowered users to create UGC, whereas the existing law entitles copyright owners to block users’ access to source materials and allows UGC platforms to exploit UGC without remuneration. This article proposes a two-pronged solution in attempting to strike a better balance between copyright owners, UGC platforms and UGC creators. The first is an ex-post remuneration rule that confers on UGC creators the legal right to use copyrighted work without asking for permission but imposes an obligation to pay remuneration, both of which pass to future UGC creators. This rule incorporates elements of Creative Commons and compulsory licensing as part of the copyright rules generally applicable to all UGC creators. The second solution proposes a community-based approach, which imposes upon UGC platforms a common-law duty of monitoring infringement and includes some legal standards that ensure fair implementation of the terms of use/service of UGC platforms.

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Edited by Matthias Ruth and Stefan Goessling-Reisemann

The goal to improve the resilience of social systems – communities and their economies – is increasingly adopted by decision makers. This unique and comprehensive Handbook focuses on the interdependencies of these social systems and the technologies that support them. Special attention is given to the ways in which resilience is conceptualized by different disciplines, how resilience may be assessed, and how resilience strategies are implemented. Case illustrations are presented throughout to aid understanding.
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Edited by Paul Nihoul and Pieter Van Cleynenbreugel

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Evolving properties of intellectual capitalism

Patents and Innovations for Growth and Welfare

Ove Granstrand

Intellectual capitalism is evolving, driving and driven by technological innovations and various forms of entrepreneruship. The purpose of this eagerly anticipated book is to analyze the linkages between R & D, patents, innovations, entrepreneurship and growth. Based on a large array of national empirical and policy studies, it elaborates on a comprehensive range of innovation and IP issues that are pertinent not only to Europe but to the world as a whole. These issues include the role of patents and licensing in the governance of technology and innovation, and the various uses and abuses of patents. It further elaborates on new IP phenomena in an increasingly patent-intensive world with patent-rich multinationals and patent-savvy new entrants from Asia. In a world facing challenges that call for innovative responses, the book contains a set of valuable policy recommendations for strengthening innovativeness for economic growth and ultimately for social value creation.
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Edited by Paul Nihoul and Pieter Van Cleynenbreugel

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Ove Granstrand

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Edited by Paul Nihoul and Pieter Van Cleynenbreugel

Rapid technological innovations have challenged the conventional application of antitrust and competition law across the globe. Acknowledging these challenges, this original work analyses the roles of innovation in competition law analysis and reflects on how competition and antitrust law can be refined and tailored to innovation.
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Ove Granstrand

The aim of this ending chapter is to present a structured summary of the previous chapters and tie them together through lingering on some cross-chapter themes and contributions in view of the aims of the book. Some of the main themes in this book at macro-level will moreover be tied into a previous book of mine 20 years back (as of April 2018) on the rise of intellectual capitalism and the economics and management of IP at micro-level. The chapter will end with a final plea for transnational technology and innovation governance in light of the crucial roles of new technologies and innovations and for global challenges and welfare. The general aim of this book has been to present a research-based analysis of the linkages between R & D, patents, innovations, growth and welfare and thereby increase our knowledge about how R & D of new technologies and innovations can contribute to growth and ultimately to welfare in society. A corollary aim has then been to focus specifically on patents and their linkages since patent and IP issues have been somewhat disconnected in general from R & D, innovations and economic growth in studies and debate of the latter. A subsidiary aim has been to clarify and offer a number of key concepts, distinctions and models in an attempt to contribute to a professional language in the innovation policy and management area. A final aim of the book has been to contribute to research in the innovation and IP area by offering some answers to common research questions as well as offering methods and suggestions for further IP policy research.

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Edited by Paul Nihoul and Pieter Van Cleynenbreugel

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Edited by Paul Nihoul and Pieter Van Cleynenbreugel