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Giovanni Russo and Laura Chies

The service industries have grown to absorb between two-thirds and three-quarters of total employment in advanced economies. The service industries combine great employment growth with limited productivity growth, prompting a policy dilemma, the affordability of services. After reviewing the recent literature on the shift towards the services, in spite of unfavorable relative price changes, and the role of rising income effects, this chapter presents the input-output framework for service productivity analysis and uses it to analyze the externalizations of in-house services to the market place by firms and households, which are called outsourcing and tertiarization, respectively. The chapter also discusses service growth factors other than demand and supply forces, namely institutional factors, offshoring and trade.

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Thijs ten Raa

The core instrument of input-output analysis is a matrix of technical coefficients. This input-output matrix orders national accounts by interconnecting the use and make statistics of the different sectors, traces indirect economic effects or multipliers, and is used to map environmental impacts or footprints. At all levels there are issues of its dimension, not only size but also type - commodities or industries - and resolution of these issues requires that statisticians, economists (applied and theoretical), and policy analysts (including environmental) familiarize themselves with each other's work. All contribute various chapters of the handbook and these are interrelated in this introductory chapter.

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Thijs ten Raa

The theory underlying indirect, multiplier effects of final consumption is detailed in this chapter. The classical example is the computation of the factors of production, first and foremost labor, embodied in final products. These embodiments are determined by taking the Leontief inverse of the matrix of direct input-output coefficients. Conditions on the input-output matrix which are both necessary and sufficient for the convergence of the multiplier effects are presented. Further multiplier effects due to household consumption are incorporated. The less labor is embodied in a product of an economy, the more productive the economy is in making that product. The relationship between input-output analysis and productivity measurement is detailed. The neoclassical approach of measuring total factor productivity by measuring input reductions using fixed prices has been criticized and alternative "effective" industry productivity growth rates have been presented in the input-output literature, but the two approaches will be demonstrated to be perfectly consistent. The analysis is also shown to encompass inefficiency measures and service productivity measures.

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Thijs ten Raa

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Joerg Beutel

This chapter explains in painstaking detail the compilation of input, output, and input-output tables in the modern System of National Accounts framework. The treatments of valuation and margin issues are presented and the presentation is elucidated using the example of the Belgium accounts. At long last there is a detailed, accessible exposition of input-output compilation, authored by an eminent contributor to national accounting and input-output analysis.

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Umed Temursho

An input-output coefficient may vary between observations because of objective or subjective differences, such as spatial differentiation and measurement errors, respectively. The literature is organized by methodology. The first methodology is deterministic error analysis. Upper and lower bounds on exogenous variables (input-output coefficients and final demand) transmit into upper and lower bounds on endogenous variables (output). The analysis is not straightforward because Leontief inversion is a non-linear operation. The second methodology is the econometric estimation of input-output coefficients using establishment data. The third methodology returns to the transmission of errors but now takes into account the canceling out of random errors, yielding sharper results. The expected value of the Leontief inverse is compared to the standard Leontief inverse of the expected input-output coefficients matrix. Systematic establishment differences are the subject of the fourth methodology, the full probability density function approach, which is essentially an aggregation procedure. The next two methodologies are new and promising. Monte Carlo simulations are extended to equilibrium analysis and Bayesian and entropy approaches address data treatment such as balancing.

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Brian R. Copeland

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Brian R. Copeland

This research review brings together a selection of recent articles by leading scholars on the economics of international trade and the environment. The review assembles key papers published between 2000 and 2013 that investigate the major themes in the field including the effects of globalization on environmental outcomes, the effects of environmental policy on international competitiveness, evidence on the pollution haven hypothesis, effects of trade on the sustainability of renewable resources, interaction between trade policy and environmental policy and trade and climate change.
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Brian R. Copeland

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Brian R. Copeland