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Hans-Peter Brunner

Open access

Hans-Peter Brunner

Open access

Hans-Peter Brunner

Chapter 4, apart from presenting a succinct roadmap for developing Asian regional cluster ecologies, recommends in detail the development of an Asian Regional Integration Observatory. Such an observatory provides a regional consensual focus for operating regionally productive and inclusive activities.

Open access

Hans-Peter Brunner

Open access

Hans-Peter Brunner

The second and third chapters, acknowledging the differences between the Baltic Sea Region and Asia, spell out key lessons from the Baltic Sea Regional experience, which are applicable in the context of Asian regions. Chapter 2 shows how Baltic Sea Region economies quickly revived the economic mystique of the Eurasian medieval silk roads, the trading union of the ‘Hanse’, with their cooperative bottom-up and consensual regional development institutions. These resurrected institutions successfully leveraged the regional drivers of productivity growth. Productivity growth was accompanied by increased economic inclusiveness (cohesion) in the region through, among others, institutional twinning programs for human capital accumulation.

Open access

Hans-Peter Brunner

Chapter 3, taking into account field interactions in the Greater Mekong Subregion and in Central Asia Regional Economic Cooperation economies, demonstrates a need for policy and knowledge tools in Asia which can drive regions successfully into the ecology of clusters and economic corridors: (a) via agglomeration economies; (b) via increase in value-added share in and along regional and global value chains; and (c) via structure transformation into higher skill industries and services.

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Xiangping Jia, Yamei Hu and George Hendrikse

In recent years, China’s government promoted the emergence of Farmer Professional Cooperatives (FPCs) and anticipated restructuring the production system of agriculture through larger-scale operations more like those in Europe or America. Notwithstanding the immense initiative, there is insufficient knowledge about how this changes the governance of farmer cooperatives at the local level. Based on a national survey conducted in 2009, this chapter shows that decision-making of production and marketing within FPCs in China is retained by individual farmers. However, the decision rights of farming are decomposed into input procurement, output marketing, and production. While the rights regarding production stay with family farms, the decision rights regarding input purchase and output marketing tend to be committed to FPCs. The governance structure of FPCs presents hybrid forms of both hierarchy and family farming. The study also finds that product attributes (such as perishability, marketing frequency, and branding), heterogeneity of the membership, and agribusiness policies affect the decision rights within the FPCs in China.
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Jos Bijman

This chapter argues that farmer collective action in developing countries is in a process of transformation. While traditional farmer organizations and cooperatives had social, political and economic functions, the new producer organizations (POs) are mainly focusing on improving the market access of their members. Providing market information, establishing quality control systems and improving logistics are some of the main functions of the new POs. As POs come in many kinds and sizes, the chapter first presents a typology, particularly distinguishing between market-oriented business organizations and other rural membership organizations. This chapter reviews the literature on the role of POs in vertical coordination, contracting and market access. Finally, it discusses the effects of the assumed transformation process on the inclusiveness of the organization, on the efficiency of the internal governance, and on strengthening member relations.
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Edited by Jos Bijman, Roldan Muradian and Jur Schuurman

Agricultural cooperatives and producer organizations are institutional innovations which have the potential to reduce poverty and improve food security. This book presents a raft of international case studies, from developing and transition countries, to analyse the internal and external challenges that these complex organizations face and the solutions that they have developed. The contributors provide a greater understanding of the transformation of traditional community organizations into modern farmer-owned businesses. They cover issues including: the impact on rural development and inclusiveness, the role of social capital, formal versus informal organizations, democratic participation and member relations, and their role in value chains.