Browse by title

You are looking at 41 - 50 of 1,716 items :

  • Industrial Economics x
  • Economics and Finance x
Clear All Modify Search
You do not have access to this content

Patrizio Bianchi and Sandrine Labory

Chapter 5 puts together the analysis carried out in previous chapters to discuss the industrial policy implications of the fourth industrial revolution. The main idea is that manufacturing revolutions call for comprehensive industrial policy. A focus is made on industrial policy at the regional level, and it is shown, through the experience of the Emilia-Romagna region in Italy, that regions have a role to play in designing and implementing comprehensive industrial policies effective in preparing their industries and population for the industrial revolution. It is argued that in times of important change the objective of industrial policy should be resilience, namely the capacity of the economy and the society to adapt.

You do not have access to this content

Salvatore Alaimo

Nonprofit organizations in the United States contract out for services annually for an estimated total of more than $1 trillion, and contract management has grown as a profession, yet this activity has not garnered much attention from researchers and scholars. The purpose of this research is to help establish a research agenda and raise management concerns for this activity driven by performance, legal, social, economic, political and ethical implications. It examines examples of nonprofits contracting out for services, the dynamics of those contractual relationships, and fiscal year data from 22 945 501(c)(3) nonprofit organizations. Types of services contracted, their cost, subsector trends, and the impacts of organizational size and specialization are revealed. Recommendations for nonprofit management practice and suggestions for how researchers and scholars can fill the existing gaps in our knowledge are discussed.

You do not have access to this content

Dong-Bae Kim and Fang Lee Cooke

This chapter looks at the introduction and practice of HRM deployed in Korean companies since the Asian Financial Crisis and the relationship between HRM and labor unions. The limited evidence from recent surveys and studies suggests that new HRM practices employed since the 1997 Asian Financial Crisis may have contributed to the gradual decline in union density, from a high of 18.6 per cent in 1989 to 10.2 per cent in 2015. Analysis did not find systematic evidence that HRM has directly affected labor unions, except where there was a change in union status from union to non-union. These results echo other researchers’ conclusion that the effect of labor union substitution with HRM practice is a primarily US phenomenon. A review of the extant empirical studies shows that labor unions play different roles in the adoption of specific HRM/management practices, with various impacts on workers and gendered implications.

You do not have access to this content

Edited by Young-Myon Lee and Bruce E. Kaufman

The Evolution of Korean Industrial and Employment Relations explores current employment and workplace relations practice in South Korea, tracing their origins to key historical events and giving cultural, politico-economic and global context to the inevitable cultural adaptation in one of Asia’s ‘miraculous’ democracies.
You do not have access to this content

Yongjin Nho and Hyung-Tag Kim

This chapter explores the militant unionism of Korean labor, tracing its form to a history of resistance to authoritarianism. While militant labor unionism has had some successes, including gains in and protection of wages, it appears burdened with unintended consequences in the enterprise-centered landscape of Korea: inter-union rivalry and increasing wage differentials by firm size and employment status, as well as negative employment outcomes. While unions have attempted to reorganize along industrial lines, they have to date been effectively muted despite distorted statistics suggesting the contrary. The two competing national unions – the ‘old unionism’ enterprise-based FKTU, and the industrializing KCTU, further complicate the picture, with branch affiliate negotiations effectively draining industry level vigor. Case discussion of the Korean Financial Industry (FKTU affiliate) and Korean Metal Workers Union (KCTU affiliate) helps to shed light on the reality of multi-employer bargaining practices.

You do not have access to this content

Patrizio Bianchi and Sandrine Labory

Chapter 2 examines the previous industrial revolutions, showing not only the important technological innovations introduced in each of them but also the deep impact they have on the society and culture. The main reason is that industrial revolutions are primarily transitions in prevailing production processes, or manufacturing regimes. Industrial revolutions are very complex phenomena and this has to be taken into account in the analysis of the fourth industrial revolution and its policy implications. Particular attention is paid to the deep changes in educational systems associated with industrial revolutions, as this might be a lesson in policy for the current – fourth – industrial revolution.

This content is available to you

Dong-One Kim

This content is available to you

Edited by Bruce A. Seaman and Dennis R. Young

You do not have access to this content

Patrizio Bianchi and Sandrine Labory

Chapter 3 analyses the fourth industrial revolution: what technological innovations are involved, to what extent the speed of change in this revolution is faster than in previous revolutions, the impact on manufacturing systems and the position and efforts of different countries in this deep transformation. An important characteristic of this revolution is that data seems to be the raw material of this new development phase. Digitalisation and hyperconnection are thus key transforming strategic elements of socio-economic systems, and industry in particular. A new manufacturing regime seems to be emerging, after mass production and flexible production of the second and third revolutions respectively, namely mass customisation.

You do not have access to this content

Dennis R. Young and Lewis Faulk

This chapter examines the economic and organizational factors underlying the formation, structure and functioning of multi-site nonprofit organizations. We characterize such organizations as associations in which the members are themselves organizations rather than individuals. Multi-site nonprofits are manifested in various forms including federations, franchises, membership associations, systems, leagues, decentralized corporations, and networks. Such organizational structures are seen as mechanisms for nonprofits to achieve efficient scale in promulgating their missions and services. Various growth scenarios are considered including expansion, imitation and affiliation, and agglomeration and networking of single cell organizations over time. The particular structures that these organizations assume are determined by a variety of factors including economies of scale and scope, transactions costs, principal–agent considerations, and inter-organizational externalities. In light of new technologies, the study of inter-organizational networks is seen as an important frontier of research on multi-site nonprofit organizations.