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Edited by Charles H. Matthews and Eric W. Liguori

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Edited by Charles H. Matthews and Eric W. Liguori

The third volume of the Annals of Entrepreneurship Education and Pedagogy critically examines past practices, current thinking, and future insights into the ever-expanding world of Entrepreneurship education. Prepared under the auspices of the United States Association for Small Business and Entrepreneurship (USASBE), this compendium covers a broad range of scholarly, practical, and thoughtful perspectives on a compelling range of entrepreneurship education issues.
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Michael L. Barnett and Robert M. Salomon

Are financial and social performance negatively or positively associated? Extant theoretical and empirical research has supported both contradictory positions (Margolis and Walsh, 2003; Orlitzky, Schmidt, and Rynes, 2003; Rowley and Berman, 2000; Mahon and Griffin, 1999; Roman, Hayibor, and Agle, 1999; Griffin and Mahon, 1997; Ullmann, 1985). In this paper, we reconcile these divergent views through an empirical study of socially responsible investing (SRI).

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Jill Kickul, Lisa Gundry, Jacqueline Orr and Mark Griffiths

Social Entrepreneurship is an emerging and rapidly changing field that examines the practice of identifying, starting and growing successful mission-driven for-profit and nonprofit ventures, that is, organizations that strive to advance social change through innovative solutions. For educators teaching in this field, we advocate for a Design Thinking approach that can be integrated into social entrepreneurship education. Specifically, we believe that many of the Design Thinking principles are especially suitable and useful for educators to facilitate student learning as they create and incubate social ventures. We also advance a broader conceptual framework, which we describe as the four main “mega-themes” in social entrepreneurship education, namely innovation, impact, sustainability and scale. We offer ways in which the Design Thinking steps can be integrated and applied to each of these themes and accelerate the social venture creation process. We conclude by discussing and presenting how Design Thinking can complement an overall Systems Thinking perspective.

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Michael L. Barnett

When discussing the business case for corporate social responsibility in the classroom, I often start by showing contrasting clips from the movie Other People’s Money , which is about a hostile takeover of a struggling firm called New England Wire and Cable. I first show a speech by the firm’s chairman, ‘Jorgy’ Jorgeson. Played by Gregory Peck, Jorgy is quite adept at making an impassioned plea to stockholders, imploring them to stick with the company rather than sell to ‘Larry the Liquidator’ Garfield who, true to his nickname, seeks to liquidate the firm. Then it’s Larry’s turn, wherein Danny DeVito channels his inner (not so much outer) Gordon Gecko in arguing that shareholders should embrace their good ol’ greed: ‘And lest we forget, that’s the only reason any of you became stockholders in the first place. You want to make money! You don’t care if they manufacture wire and cable, fried chicken, or grow tangerines! You want to make money!’

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Ying Zhang

This chapter explores business education’s past, current, and the future in order to shed a light on the education revolution and the role of entrepreneurship in education. It is posited in this essay that both play a significant role in helping our society transform from an inequality to the equality-oriented structure. Education is not only the mean to transform a society from one stage of economic development to another, but also an important driver of our humanity and civilization development.

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Michael L. Barnett

Do firms benefit from their voluntary efforts to alleviate the many problems confronting society? A vast literature establishing a “business case” for corporate social responsibility (CSR) appears to find that usually they do. However, as argued herein, the business case literature has established only that firms usually benefit from responding to the demands of their primary stakeholders. The nature of the relationship between the interests of business and those of broader society, beyond a subset of powerful primary stakeholders, remains an open question despite this vast literature

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Michael L. Barnett

Oh, I hear you: ‘Barnett, what are you trying to pull here? Isn’t this just a collection of reprints?’ Sure, the bulk of the book consists of reprints. But if you’ll allow me to explain, there’s much more to it than that. And besides, there’s merit in reprints. In this book, I put forth a critical view of the business case for corporate social responsibility.

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Jerome A. Katz

In corners of academe today one can hear “the business plan is dead,” but is it? This chapter seeks to shine a light on where and when business plans remain not only alive, but central to the achievement of entrepreneurship dreams. To give away the conclusion in advance, those places represent the vast majority of startup situations - among the vast majority of investors, the vast majority of bankers, and the vast majority of professionals. The chapter concludes with some observations on how business plans and feasibility analyses fit into contemporary entrepreneurship pedagogy.

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Cheryl Bodnar, Kimble Byrd and Linda Ross

Faculty development programs allow faculty to learn new content and gain insights from like-minded faculty.  This article describes an Innovation and Entrepreneurship Faculty Certificate program that leverages a community of practice model to allow faculty members to integrate content related to entrepreneurial mindset into their classes.  The certificate program takes place during the academic year and covers topics including creativity, ideation, business model canvas, innovation canvas, and teaching resources.  Through a partnership with the Faculty Center this certificate program has been able to provide recognition to faculty members that is valuable as part of their tenure and recontracting process.