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Edited by Trine Bille, Anna Mignosa and Ruth Towse

Teaching Cultural Economics is the first book of its kind to offer inspiration and guidance for teaching cultural economics through short chapters, a wide scope of knowledge and teaching cases by experienced teachers who are expert in the topic.
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Edited by Helen Walkington, Jennifer Hill and Sarah Dyer

This exemplary Handbook provides readers with a novel synthesis of international research, evidence-based practice and personal reflections to offer an overview of the current state of knowledge in the field of teaching geography in higher education. Chapters cover the three key transitions – into, through, and out of higher education – to present a thorough analysis of the topic.
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The Art of Mooting

Theories, Principles and Practice

Mark Thomas and Lucy Cradduck

This book examines the theories relevant to the development of skills necessary for effective participation in competition moots. By consideration of underlying theories the authors develop unique models of the skills of the cognitive, psychomotor and affective domains and effective team dynamics; and emphasise the importance of written submissions. The authors use this analysis to develop a unique integrated model that informs the process of coaching moot teams according to reliable principles.
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Clive Kerridge

Experiential learning - learning by doing - has long been advocated as an effective pedagogy for knowledge retention and soft skills development, with the role of reflection recognised as a key ingredient. Good business simulations are used successfully in many environments and professions, including Higher Education. They are often enjoyed by students and facilitate the three types of learning: effective, cognitive and behavioural. We look at the benefits to students and instructors of including business simulations within blended learning study programmes; which type of ‘sim’ to choose and when to use it; what to do (and what not to do!) to ensure simulations, and the associated experiential learning, contribute to student engagement and effective learning in a business school context.

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Edited by Kathy Daniels, Caroline Elliott, Simon Finley and Colin Chapman

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Learning and Teaching in Higher Education

Perspectives from a Business School

Edited by Kathy Daniels, Caroline Elliott, Simon Finley and Colin Chapman

There is often little guidance available on how to teach in universities, despite there being increasing pressure to raise teaching standards, as well as no official requirement for academics to have any specific teaching qualification in many countries. This invaluable book comprehensively addresses this issue, providing an overview of teaching in a business school that covers all stages of student learning.
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Edited by Kathy Daniels, Caroline Elliott, Simon Finley and Colin Chapman

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Susan M. Adams, Gavin M. Schwarz and Anthony F. Buono

In the tradition of providing pragmatic, useful, and realistic organizational change outcomes, this book focuses on improving our understanding of and experience with organizational change through focused, high impact change-related simulations and experiential exercises for teaching, facilitating, and coping with change. If organizational change and transformation involve a combination of understanding, fixing (or unfixing), and practiced behavior, and as part of improvements to the conceptualization, formulation, and implementation of change, then the process of learning from experience is recognized as a means of deeper learning about change. This effect is especially relevant when we acknowledge the scale and significance of just how many organizational change efforts end in failure or are limited in their outcomes (e.g., Beer et al., 1990; Hughes, 2011), suggesting the role that experience can play. Rather than concentrate on explaining change or focusing on how to manage change in this context, however – as illustrated throughout this book – when it comes to organization development and change, emphasis should be placed on the processes of and strategies for learning from active experimentation to increase individual and organizational effectiveness. It is this focus on engaged techniques for improvement and well-being through practice that the exercises in this book address – a focus incorporating “That was great!” outcomes for both participants and facilitator. This emphasis on the value of learning from change and about change through personal experience is an important part of helping organizational members to improve the many factors that bring about organizational effectiveness. It is this key feature of the book – the importance of experience in learning about change – that is our focus: learning by doing. The underlying lesson is fairly straightforward – experience counts. So, understanding how to incorporate participatory learning into change is a basic feature of effective change intervention. Continuing an established tradition, making sure that we fully appreciate and engage with simulation and experience is an intrinsic part of educational efforts to facilitate changing. Having read this far in the book, you are already aware of the essential place and value of using experience to facilitate change. Yet, this aspect of learning is often minimized or overlooked in favor of other features of pedagogy or attempts to change behavior. Moreover, despite the voluminous extent of work dedicated to understanding change and its features through “toolkit” approaches or ways toward sustainable change, we appear to repeatedly and regularly fall back or focus on a direct training approach: “how to” change and manuals describing such development. The value of this book is in asserting, as we do in the introductory chapter to this volume, that this common approach is too restrictive in today’s fastpaced, limited-attention, and constantly changing world. Training people for organizational change in traditional, “mapped out” ways also fails to recognize that today, organizational members living change and university students learning about change look at their learning environment through a different lens, heavily influenced by their experiences. Change is more meaningful when we reflect and incorporate our experiences.

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Anthony F. Buono, Susan M. Adams and Gavin M. Schwarz

This book is intended to help prepare change leaders – at all organizational levels – to effectively deal with the myriad challenges inherent in the process of organizational change. While it has literally become a well-worn cliche that organizations and their management face unrelenting demands for change (Kerber and Buono, 2018), the simple reality – which is not so simple in terms of its impact on organizational life – is that the majority of change efforts fall well short of their intended goals. Despite a literal avalanche of research and managerial attention devoted to conceptualizing and empirically testing an array of change management practices (see Abrahamson, 2000; de Caluwe and Vermaak, 2002; Jamieson et al., 2016; King and Wright, 2007; Kotter and Cohen, 2002), successful organizational change often remains an elusive quest. Unfortunately, many of our educational efforts to develop the capabilities of students and early career executives to successfully deal with the subtleties, nuances, and complexities of organizational change similarly tend to fall well short of the need. Thus, in a “back to the future” spirit, this volume seeks to confront this challenge by resurrecting a powerful hands-on, immersive pedagogy: high impact change-related simulations and experiential exercises. Effective organizational change involves a combination of understanding, learning and unlearning, and practiced behavior as part of the underlying conceptualization, formulation, and implementation processes. The book presents a series of exercises – each with background context, explicit directions, facilitator suggestions, and debriefing guidelines – that promote learning and developing readiness for change, from preparing people for change, understanding and managing resistance, grappling with cultural confines and confusion, dealing with communication challenges, and coping with change-related obstacles, to seeking buy-in for the change. Emphasis throughout the book is placed on developing change-related competencies.

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Preparing for High Impact Organizational Change

Experiential Learning and Practice

Edited by Gavin M. Schwarz, Anthony F. Buono and Susan M. Adams

Preparing for High Impact Change: Experiential Learning and Practice provides an overview of change processes for teaching, facilitating, and coping with change. Tested high-impact exercises in the book will prepare change leaders at all organizational levels to deal with the myriad of challenges inherent in the process of organizational change. This book is a resource for consultants, educators, students and practitioners in corporate training and development roles.