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Edited by Russell W. Belk, Giana M. Eckhardt and Fleura Bardhi

With the radical growth in the ubiquity of digital platforms, the sharing economy is here to stay. This Handbook explores the nature and direction of the sharing economy, interrogating its key dynamics and evolution over the past decade and critiquing its effect on society.
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Edited by Ada Scupola and Lars Fuglsang

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Services, Experiences and Innovation

Integrating and Extending Research

Edited by Ada Scupola and Lars Fuglsang

Whilst innovation has traditionally focused on manufacturing, recently research surrounding service innovation has been flourishing. Furthermore, as consumers become ever more sophisticated and look for experiences, a research field investigating this topic has also emerged. This book aims to develop an integrated approach to the field of experience and services through innovation by showing that it is necessary to take several factors into account. As such, it makes a substantial and compelling contribution to the interdependencies between innovation, services and experience research.
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Minha Hwang

‘Big data’ refers to datasets whose size is beyond the typical database and analytics software tools to capture, store, manage, and analyze. This chapter describes the opportunities and challenges that ‘big data’ bring to academic research in economics and marketing in retail and distribution. Several data sources are described, as well as methodologies for analyzing them and opportunities for linking information from multiple high-volume, high-velocity sources, including purchase data, Internet search data, network and unstructured data, and consumer location data.

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William Hickman and Julie Holland Mortimer

Estimates of demand are identified from variation in the choice sets that consumers face and the corresponding purchase probabilities for individual products. Retail settings often provide an opportunity to observe variation in consumer choice sets that arises not only through changes in observable product characteristics, such as price, but also through changes in product availability. We review the literature that develops methods for estimating demand in these settings, with emphasis on two mechanisms through which product availability may vary: product assortment decisions, and stockout events. We also briefly discuss variation in availability that may arise from limited consumer information.

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Roger R. Betancourt

The first part of this chapter explains the role of distribution services in understanding important features of the evolution of retailing in the first decade of the twenty-first century. Their main features as outputs of retail institutions enhance our understanding of the evolution of Walmart and big-box retailers, warehouse clubs such as Costco, limits of Internet channels, and features of shopping centers. Their role underlying the demand for retail products enhance our ability to use and interpret scanner data in the estimation of cost of living indexes and results with externalities generated through advertising by industry associations and Internet channels. Both demand and supply features of distribution services play a role in determining customer satisfaction in retail industries and in revealing neglected aspects of productivity analysis in retailing. In the second part, the chapter explains the role of distribution services in understanding the impact of information and communication technologies on the evolution of retailing and distribution in the twenty-first century. These technologies (ICT) are critical in allowing the separation of consumption, distribution and production of distribution services across space. Spatial separability with respect to distribution services, in particular accessibility of location to acquire the product and breadth and depth of assortments, provides the basis for the powerful economic impact of the Internet in many industries, for example, Amazon´s role in book distribution. Furthermore, this separability combined with the difficulties in separating the cost of distribution from the cost of production in the case of industries where the products sold are core services lead to important aspects of relational contracts prevalent in business format retail franchises. Both parts are integrated through a discussion of a number of novel organizational forms arising in twenty-first century retailing and distribution which are a consequence of this spatial separability of distribution services. At least one feature of this process, illustrated by home delivery and sometimes called customization quality, applies to all service sectors as a result of ICT penetration.

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Anthony Dukes and Tansev Geylani

This chapter explores the implications of dominant retailers for marketing channels – the system through which manufacturers distribute their products to consumers. The emergence of a few dominant retailers has altered the way in which members of the marketing channel make decisions. The chapter first presents an economic framework to explore the source of retail dominance. It then explores how several key decisions (for example, product quality and assortment, prices, market data collaboration, and advertising) taken within the marketing channel are affected by the dominance of certain retailers. Antitrust implications are also assessed.

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Charles Murry and Henry S. Schneider

In this chapter we describe the institutions and economics of new- and used-car retailing. Our aim is to provide a resource for researchers interested in the automobile market. We focus on three categories of economic concepts relevant to car retailing: dealership location choice, including agglomeration, entry, and exit; determinants of car pricing; and information, which is central to the used-car market but also affects the new-car market. We also provide a primer on the institutions of car retailing and a reference on data sources for researchers interested in empirical work involving cars.

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Howard Smith

This chapter surveys the literature on bilateral retailer-supplier pricing relations, with a focus on how they affect retail prices. The discussion brings together three strands of research that are usually discussed separately: the theory of pricing in vertically related oligopoly markets, the theory of price discrimination and buyer power in intermediate good markets, and the empirical analysis of retailer supplier relations. In the theoretical literature, retail prices are very sensitive to assumptions on the nature of retailer-supplier relations, including (1) whether suppliers can use vertical restraints, (2) market structure upstream and downstream, (3) whether the offers suppliers make to retailers are public or private, and (4) whether, and how, firms use nonlinear tariff structures. Theory has also found a number of factors that generate more bargaining power for retailers of greater size. The empirical literature is, as yet, relatively limited, partly because of the confidential nature of retailer–supplier pricing. It has studied the impacts of downstream market structure on retail prices, and the adverse effect on competition from the introduction of resale price maintenance. There is some evidence showing that large retailers secure lower prices from suppliers, particularly when the retailer has a choice of supplier.

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Victor Aguirregabiria and Junichi Suzuki

We survey the recent empirical literature on structural models of market entry and spatial competition in oligopoly retail industries. We start with the description of a framework that encompasses various models that have been estimated in empirical applications. We use this framework to discuss important specification assumptions in this literature: firm heterogeneity; specification of price competition; structure of spatial competition; firms’ information; dynamics; multi-store firms; and structure of unobservables. We next describe different types of datasets that have been used in empirical applications. Finally, we discuss econometric issues that researchers should deal with in the estimation of these models, including multiple equilibria and unobserved market heterogeneity. We comment on the advantages and limitations of alternative estimation methods, and how these methods relate to identification restrictions. We conclude with some issues and topics for future research.