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Giving Behaviours and Social Cohesion

How People Who ‘Give’ Make Better Communities

Lorna Zischka

‘Giving’ time and money to the community indicates the existence of relationships that draw people together, and ‘who people give to’ indicates how inclusive these relational networks are. Using UK data for the analysis, Zischka argues that a person’s willingness to ‘give' is not only influenced by social cohesion; it also helps to generate social cohesion. For thriving communities, we therefore need to consider our ‘giving’ as well as our ‘getting’.
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Edited by John R. Bryson, Lauren Andres and Rachel Mulhall

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Edited by John R. Bryson, Lauren Andres and Rachel Mulhall

This Research Agenda provides both a state-of-the-art review of existing research on city-regions, and expands on new research approaches. Expert contributors from across the globe explore key areas for reading city-regions, including: trade, services and people, regional differentiation, big data, global production networks, governance and policy, and regional development. The book focuses on developing a more integrated and systematic approach to reading city-regions as part of regeneration economics, identifying conceptual and methodological developments in this field of study.
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David Kaufmann

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Varieties of Capital Cities

The Competitiveness Challenge for Secondary Capitals

David Kaufmann

The political and symbolic centrality of capital cities has been challenged by increasing economic globalization. This is especially true of secondary capital cities; capital cities which, while being the seat of national political power, are not the primary economic city of their nation state. David Kaufmann examines the unique challenges that these cities face entering globalised, inter-urban competition while not possessing a competitive political economy.
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Yulai Wan and Anming Zhang

An airport’s capacity is in general indivisible and hence cannot be adjusted continuously, while the demand for airport services tends to increase over time as with the growing economy. Consequently, when new runways are completed, they are likely under-utilized, but as traffic increases over time, congestion occurs. It may therefore be optimal to vary airport charges over time by keeping charges low at the early stage of the infrastructure life cycle and raising charges towards the end of its life cycle. This chapter discusses the benefits of time-dependent charges by considering the airport’s economic impacts as well as the changing economic environment, such as the unemployment level. The analysis is based on a case study of Hong Kong International Airport. The authors attempt to demonstrate quantitatively the above airport pricing strategy, and to further show how to conduct a real-case cost-benefit analysis of airport pricing for policy application.

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Keisuke Sato and Atsushi Koike

The Spatial Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) model is one of the powerful tools to understand the regional economic effects on transport development. In this model, Armington elasticities are known to be important for the properties of model behavior but are seldom estimated empirically in the domestic area. Armington elasticities in multi-regional trade in Japan are estimated in this chapter. The estimated elasticities are intended for use in the Spatial CGE model for transport policy. The authors suggest that estimation is possible for Japan, for which economic data are generally considered poor, provided appropriate account is taken of transport cost.

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Zhenhua Chen and Kingsley E. Haynes

Transportation investment policy faces an unprecedented critical moment especially when traditional public funding sources shrink. How to allocate the limited funding source among different modes of transportation infrastructure to maintain their quality and function is not only a challenging decision, it also requires the knowledge and understanding of the relationships between transportation infrastructure and regional economic development. This study conducts a comparative assessment investigating this relationship with a focus on a multimodal perspective. Through the comparison of the authors’ previous evaluation studies conducted at different geographic scales in the US and using different data and methodologies, the regional economic impacts of different modes of transportation infrastructures are contrasted and discussed. Although transportation infrastructure is found to have a consistent positive impact on regional development across different studies, the effects vary considerably among different modes of transportation. Issues of impact assessment and policy implications are raised and discussed.

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Edited by Kakuya Matsushima and William P. Anderson

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Kiyoshi Kobayashi and Masamitsu Onishi

This chapter focuses on the competitive relationships among shopping districts that consist of small-size retail shops in cities, and other shopping districts or shopping centers. When consumers shop in multiple retail shops, a correlation among the profits of each shop arises through consumer behavior with respect to choosing a shopping district. When there are such demand externalities, the decentralized price-determining activities of individual retail shops cannot bring about the internalization of demand externalities; this creates a problem in that the market areas of shopping districts become too small. This study focuses on the price adjustment function that arises from the use of discount point systems in existing shopping districts; it also considers the measures used to realize the socially optimal market structure. In addition, the authors clarify that it is essential that price restriction mechanisms involving member shops in discount point systems work to maintain sustainable price coordination functions in existing shopping districts.