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Phil Armstrong

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Phil Armstrong

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Mikael Sundström

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Can Heterodox Economics Make a Difference?

Conversations With Key Thinkers

Phil Armstrong

In a series of in-depth interviews with leading economists and policy-makers from different schools including Austrian, Monetarist, New-Keynesian, Post-Keynesian, Modern Monetary Theory, Marxist and Institutionalist, this intriguing book sheds light upon the behaviour of economists and the sociology of the economics profession by enabling economists to express their views on a wide range of issues. 
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Geoff Harcourt

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Sheila Dow

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How Not to Write a Thesis or Dissertation

A Guide to Success through Failure

Mikael Sundström

If you thought a book about thesis writing would make for wearisome reading, think again! In seven entertaining and enlightening chapters, Mikael Sundström sheds light on the trials and tribulations of academic writing, offering guidance on how to become a doyen of academic disaster – and, more importantly, how to avoid that fate.
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Phil Armstrong

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Mikael Sundström

In this introductory chapter, the aims and ambitions of the book are set out and explained.

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Phil Armstrong

Some optimistic heterodox economists felt that the effects of the global financial crisis might open the door for a new approach capable of providing a better understanding of how a monetary production economy works. However, this hope quickly evaporated as mainstream economists regained their confidence and the orthodox paradigm reasserted its ascendency, albeit in a slightly modified form. Three questions follow; first, how was mainstream economics able to maintain its hegemony? Second, is it nevertheless feasible that the mainstream paradigm could be challenged in the foreseeable future? Third, do heterodox economists have enough in common to work together as part of a coherent alternative approach? In a series of in-depth interviews with leading economists from different schools; Austrian, monetarist, New-Keynesian, Post-Keynesian, Modern Monetary Theory, Marxist, Sraffian and Institutionalist, as well as policy–makers, the book aims to shed light upon the behaviour of economists and the sociology of the economics profession by enabling economists to express their views on a wide range of issues. I hope to provide a stimulating resource for researchers who are interested in understanding the pre-suppositions that underpin the way key thinkers theorise and to reveal the opinions of key thinkers regarding the most important issues that the discipline might address going forward.