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Social Policy in the Middle East and North Africa

The New Social Protection Paradigm and Universal Coverage

Edited by Rana Jawad, Nicola Jones and Mahmood Messkoub

This book presents a state of the art in the developing field of social policy in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region. It offers an up-to-date conceptual analysis of social policy programmes and discourses in the MENA region by critically reviewing the range of social insurance and social assistance schemes that are currently in existence there. It also analyses and offers suggestions on which of these policies can positively impact the region’s advancement in terms of human development and in addressing social and economic inequalities and exclusion.
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Globalizing Welfare

An Evolving Asian-European Dialogue

Edited by Stein Kuhnle, Per Selle and Sven E.O. Hort

From the welfare state’s origins in Europe, the idea of human welfare being organized through a civilized, institutionalized and uncorrupt state has caught the imagination of social activists and policy-makers around the world. This is particularly influential where rapid social development is taking place amidst growing social and gender inequality. This book reflects on the growing academic and political interest in global social policy and ‘globalizing welfare’, and pays particular attention to developments in Northern European and North-East Asian countries.
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Ian Greener

This chapter combines the prescriptions from the previous four chapters of the book into a new framework that shows a comprehensive alternative approach to economic and social governance based on the economics of Stiglitz, a relational approach to social policy, a modified globalization that supports societal goals, and a democratic mode of governance. It suggests that we must rethink what we are doing now to avoid environmental catastrophe and growing inequality.

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Ian Greener

This chapter examines, using the framework constructed by the book, how economic policy has developed from the 1970s onwards. It explores how corporate dominance has come about, and what the implications of this are for social policy. It suggests that we must take closer account of how economic governance is conducted, especially in relation to the dominance of financial services, if we are to improve social policy. It shows that different models of economic governance are possible, but they involve rethinking our current priorities considerably.

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Ian Greener

This chapter examines education and education policy, making use of the framework constructed in the book, and showing how corporate dominance and oligarchy are sustained through our education processes and structures. It suggests that a very different basis of education is possible, and demonstrates the dimensions of what this would look like.

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Ian Greener

This chapter combines insights from the revised framework for the governance of welfare with those from behavioural approaches to social policy, to present a revised framework for considering economic and social policy in the 2010s, and upon which the case studies in the rest of the book will be based. It therefore demonstrates how corporate dominance and increasingly oligarchic governance combine with our behavioural flaws to create the situation we are in today.

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Ian Greener

This chapter examines the situation in the 2010s, suggesting that Jessop’s framework for the governance of welfare needs to be updated in the light of what we have learned after the financial crisis. It presents an alternative framework that puts corporate power at the centre of its analysis, before it begins to explore the consequences of that framework for understanding where we are today.

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Ian Greener

This chapter examines how health and healthcare policy have developed in the post-1970s’ period, making use of the framework developed in the book, and showing the grave inequalities that underpin our current approaches to health and healthcare. It shows the extent of corporate dominance in respect of our health and healthcare, and the dysfunctional consequences of this. It then presents an alternative view of what we can do to challenge these inequalities.

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Ian Greener

This chapter makes the case for the book, giving an account of the challenges we face in terms of social and economic governance today. It then gives an outline of the structure of the book.

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Ian Greener