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Britt Kramvig

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The Nordic Wave in Place Branding

Poetics, Practices, Politics

Edited by Cecilia Cassinger, Andrea Lucarelli and Szilvia Gyimóthy

The widespread international interest in the Nordic region and the mobility of Nordic brand imaginaries call for more research into the global relevance of Nordic place-branding practices. This book offers a timely attempt to unpack the specificity of the Nordic in regard to place branding by gathering different transdisciplinary accounts written by researchers in marketing, tourism, geography, communication, sociology and political science.
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Edited by Cecilia Cassinger, Andrea Lucarelli and Szilvia Gyimóthy

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Edited by Adriana Campelo

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Cecilia Pasquinelli

This chapter outlines a framework in which to treat the relation between cultural institutions and local economic development from a branding perspective. It does so by describing the Cultural Branding Matrix. Based on case analyses in the literature, this matrix is meant to support policy-makers and practitioners involved in cultural urban planning. It is intended to give them a sense of orientation in the field of cultural policies, which are evidently at risk of failure in contemporary cities. Even though every case and every context is characterised by different preconditions and challenges, a typification of cases may furnish a valid framework for decision-making and actions.

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Edited by Adriana Campelo

Place branding as an academic field is both challenging and under explored. In the face of an ever-expanding urban population, this Handbook addresses this knowledge deficit in order to illustrate how place branding can contribute to transforming urban agglomeration into sustainable and healthy areas.
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Kathryn Swanson, Dominic Medway and Gary Warnaby

This chapter examines the idea of brand love in relation to tourism destinations. Through the reporting of a study based in three destinations in the United States (Orlando, Florida; Minneapolis, Minnesota; and Las Vegas, Nevada), the chapter demonstrates how brand love is manifest for destination products among tourists. The chapter concludes with the development of a brand love model for destinations, arguably relevant for both academia and practice. Additionally, the research data indicate that tourists get distinct benefits out of relationships with different destinations, and this leads to the identification of three types of destination brand love related to three Greek words for ‘love’: philia (friendship type of love), storge (affection type of love) and eros (passionate type of love).

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Helle Dalsgaard Pedersen and Anette Therkelsen

What makes peripheral places attractive to highly educated out-migrants is the focus of this chapter. Based on a theoretical discussion of place attractiveness and migration studies, the study identifies three types of place attraction factors – cultural, economic and social – the last of which has been given negligible scholarly attention. The empirical investigation demonstrates that social networks are the key attraction factor for return migrants to peripheral places, and that cultural and economic factors hold secondary importance during the life phase with dependent children. Return migrants’ relations to peripheral places are, however, ambiguous in that their narrations are characterized by a movement back and forth between idyllization and identifying with and criticizing and distancing oneself from the peripheral place. Based on the theoretical and empirical discussions, place branding implications for peripheral places are reflected on.

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Gary Warnaby and Christopher J. Parker

The aim of this chapter is to explore how the ability to move with ease around an urban locale affects a user’s experience of that place, and the extent to which this may be capitalized upon for place marketing/branding purposes. We begin by outlining different aspects of mobility outlined by Tim Cresswell and, drawing on work by Michel de Certeau, explore the potential implications for place marketing/branding with particular reference to walking (and the related aspect of accessibility). Emphasizing the performative aspects of walking, we utilize some current trends in marketing theory (i.e. the service-dominant logic of marketing and a more experiential perspective on marketing) to consider how mobility – both in reality and virtually – might be appropriated for the purposes of place marketing/branding, and the processes by which these activities are planned and implemented.