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Edited by Kirsi-Maria Halonen, Roberto Caranta and Albert Sanchez-Graells

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Edited by Kirsi-Maria Halonen, Roberto Caranta and Albert Sanchez-Graells

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Transparency in EU Procurements

Disclosure Within Public Procurement and During Contract Execution

Edited by Kirsi-Maria Halonen, Roberto Caranta and Albert Sanchez-Graells

This book provides a timely analysis of transparency in public procurement law. In its first part, the book critically assesses a number of key matters from a general and comparative perspective, including corruption prevention, competition and commercial issues and access to remedies. The second part illustrates how the relevance of these aspects varies across member states of the EU.
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Kirsi-Maria Halonen, Roberto Caranta and Albert Sanchez-Graells

It follows from the CJEU case law that transparency is a general principle of EU public procurement law or at least a corollary of the general - and foundational - principle of non-discrimination. While this starting point is indisputable, how transparency translates into the rules and practices of procurement of the EU institutions and in the Member States varies very significantly. Harmonisation by the EU public procurement and concessions directives goes at times into much detail. This is for instance the case with the publication and content of the notice starting most contract award procedures. But much is left to the Member States while EU institutions apply discretely different rules. For instance, rules concerning access to documents of the award procedure and to the concluded contract are very scant or not given at all, and this is the case even if the remedies directives are taken into consideration.

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Louise Hauberg Wilhelmsen

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Louise Hauberg Wilhelmsen

The Brussels I Regulation, which ensures the free circulation of judgments within the EU, was recently revised; one of the main issues addressed was whether the Regulation affects the efficient resolution of international commercial disputes through arbitration within the Union. This book provides an in depth examination of the interface between the Regulation and international commercial arbitration. The author demonstrates that the consequences of this interface can encourage the use of delaying tactics, hampering the efficient resolution of international disputes.
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Louise Hauberg Wilhelmsen

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Louise Hauberg Wilhelmsen

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Louise Hauberg Wilhelmsen

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Louise Hauberg Wilhelmsen