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Henry N. Butler and Jonathan Klick

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Oren Bracha

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Henry N. Butler and Jonathan Klick

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Henry N. Butler and Jonathan Klick

Dedicated to the late Henry G. Manne, this authoritative collection surveys the development of law and economics both as a scholarly field and as an educational program. Starting as a niche area, centered primarily at the University of Chicago, law and economics has grown to be the dominant field in US legal scholarship. The influential articles presented in this volume trace that development from the mid-20th century through to today, focusing on both the personalities who laid the groundwork for the field’s success and the intellectual debates that fueled its growth. Together with an original introduction by the editors, this collection is a valuable research tool for academics and students interested in the history of law and economics.
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Oren Bracha

The comprehensive Research Review includes some of the most important and influential articles published on the history of intellectual property. The seminal works compiled encompass a broad variety of specific legal fields, periods and methodological perspectives. The collection focuses on the three main subfields of intellectual property: patent, copyright and trademark law. Volume I covers patent and copyright in Britain as well as U.S. patents. Volume II discusses U.S. copyright and trademarks along with colonial and international intellectual property law. With an original introduction by the editor, this important Research Review will be of a great interest to legal historians, economic historians and anyone interested in intellectual property and its history.
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Oren Bracha

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Henry N. Butler and Jonathan Klick

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Wei Shen

According to the report released by the Financial Stability Board (FSB) in November 2011, shadow banking is defined as ‘credit intermediation involving entities and activities outside the regular banking system’. Put differently but simply, shadow banking is the realm of lending that does not rely on deposit-taking banks using customer money to fund loans. The International Monetary Fund (IMF) defines the shadow banking system as ‘off-balance-sheet and non-bank financial intermediation’ including Internet finance, micro-lending, asset securitization and some wealth management products. ‘Shadow banks’ in the context of Western countries refer to buy-out firms, hedge funds, venture funds and ordinary corporations which are using their investors’ money and wholesale funding to hire disgruntled bank traders, engage in direct lending and escape traditional banking regulation. In more advanced economies, shadow banking remains a key channel of credit intermediation that complements the formal banking system.

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Claudio Borio and Anna Zabai

We explore the effectiveness and balance of benefits and costs of so-called ‘unconventional’ monetary policy measures extensively implemented in the wake of the financial crisis: balance sheet policies (or ‘quantitative easing’), forward guidance and negative policy rates. We reach three main conclusions: there is ample evidence that, to varying degrees, these measures have succeeded in influencing financial conditions even though their ultimate impact on output and inflation is harder to pin down; the cost-benefit balance is likely to deteriorate over time; and the measures are generally best regarded as exceptional, for use in very specific circumstances. Whether this will turn out to be the case, however, is doubtful at best and depends on more fundamental features of monetary policy frameworks. We also provide a critique of prevailing analyses of ‘helicopter money’ and explore in more depth the role of negative nominal interest rates in our fundamentally monetary economies, highlighting some risks.