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Katalin Erdős and Attila Varga

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Harvey Goldstein, Verena Radinger-Peer and Sabine Sedlacek

Research universities fill a variety of roles within contemporary society (Goldstein et al., 1995). Arguably the most important role has been providing advanced education to a segment of the population so that they have the requisite know-how to enter the professions. A second has been to generate knowledge through research that leads to scientific progress over time and indirectly often leads to productivity growth in the economy. These have been the traditional missions of research universities since their founding in the late nineteenth century.

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Yuzhuo Cai, Po Yang and Anu Lyytinen

The literature on the role of universities in regional innovation systems mainly deals with research universities, for example, with an emphasis on knowledge transfer (Anatan, 2015). This is also the case in the Chinese context (Cai, 2018). In recent years, the importance of non-research universities in regional development and innovation has been increasingly recognized (Taylor et al., 2008). Among a small volume of studies exploring the role of universities of applied science (UASs), or non research universities, in the process of regional innovation, a constant challenge has been that of applying appropriate theoretical or analytical frameworks. Currently, most studies in this field apply theoretical insights originally developed for under standing the relationship between research universities and regional innovation systems. The most commonly used frameworks are, for instance, the Triple Helix model (Etzkowitz, 2008; Etzkowitz and Leydesdorff, 1995, 1997) for analysing the UASs and industry links (Yang et al., 2016), and the ‘five pathways to an entrepreneurial university’ (Clark, 1998) for understanding the organizational responses of UASs to the emerging demands of regional development (Lyytinen, 2011).

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Julia M. Puaschunder

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Julia M. Puaschunder

External shocks from the economic depressions and wars of the past have impacted on the quality of life of the young ever since and steered attention to social responsibility (Puaschunder, 2010). But it is unknown what future risks and opportunities will arise for the future perspectives of young people today in the aftermath of the 2008/09 World Financial Crisis given unprecedented governmental overindebtedness, an aging Western world population and irreversible environmental damage. How to face these unfamiliar challenges should become the focus of future research on intergenerational equity.

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Julia M. Puaschunder

The book has explored the innovative corporate and financial market potential to create value for society. It first described corporate and financial social responsibility in theoretical terms. The human foundation of responsibility and decision-making fallibility in responsibility were discussed. The international emergence of CSR governance was outlined in the case of the UNGC, which serves as a social responsibility international best practice guideline. CSR was portrayed as a means of conflict resolution in multi-stakeholder partnerships.

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Julia M. Puaschunder

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John Humphrey

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John Humphrey