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Edited by David Levi-Faur and Frans van Waarden

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Edited by David Levi-Faur and Frans van Waarden

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Harald Wydra and Bjørn Thomassen

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Israel (Issi) Doron and Nena Georgantzi

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Annika Zorn, Jeff Haywood and Jean-Michel Glachant

The introduction discusses how the digital trend that has substantially disrupted other sectors is transforming the higher education sector or even posing a threat to academic institutions’ core business. What could be the rationale for higher education institutions to incorporate a comprehensive digital agenda into their core strategy? Outlining the main developments over the past years in the areas of education, research and knowledge sharing, the authors argue that academic institutions are still far from grasping the full potential of what the digital offers to the academy. Not only does the adoption of online and open practices allow universities to respond to major challenges facing them today, but a digital vision also allows higher education institutions to re-define their role in society. Subsequently, the authors outline how the examples discussed in the book, stemming from a variety of academic contexts, will enrich our understanding of what ‘moving online’ might entail and how to make it work in practice.

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Moshe Hirsch and Andrew Lang

International legal scholarship has increasingly turned to various traditions of sociology and social thought to challenge the constraints of orthodox international legal thinking, and to develop new kinds of thinking, more suitable for the rapidly transforming social and political landscape in which contemporary international lawyering is done. This Research Handbook seeks to showcase this work, marking the present fertile period of creative borrowing between the disciplines of international law and sociology with a collection of works at its cutting edge. Each contributor to the Research Handbook situates their intervention within a particular tradition of sociological or social theoretical thinking, and then explains how and why this tradition is useful in thinking about some contemporary development, or problem, within the domain of international law and governance. This introductory chapter seeks to clear the ground for the contributions which follow, by outlining a map of some major theoretical conversations within sociology. It identifies three core approaches which are most commonly identified in sociological literature, and briefly reflects on a number of early engagements between international law and sociology (mainly the writings of Max Huber and Julius Stone). It then argues that more recent engagements between international law and social thought stem in significant part from attempts to understand the nature, dynamics, and stakes of globalization as it relates to law, and reflect the main arena in which the significance of post-structural social theory for international law continues to be negotiated and defined.

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Edited by Israel Doron and Nena Georgantzi

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Salla Sissonen

As an afterthought to the chapters in the book, this epilogue plays with the idea of looking to the future by briefly examining what is happening at earlier stages of education today. By understanding some of the objectives of the Finnish national core curriculum 2014 and taking a look at the practices at school, we can imagine the optimal skillsets that a now 12-year-old child will have when they enter higher education in a few years’ time. Optimally, we will be faced with a person with a developed understanding of how they learn best, a creative learner and problem-solver with skills in meaningful use of technology. This chapter argues that it does not mean the efficient future learners will not require teaching; on the contrary, we will continue to need competent pedagogical thinkers to guide the students on their individual paths to lifelong-learning.

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Edited by David Levi-Faur and Frans van Waarden

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Edited by Israel Doron and Nena Georgantzi