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Edited by Arthur Schram and Aljaž Ule

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Jan M. Broekman

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Jan M. Broekman

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Jan M. Broekman

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Jan M. Broekman

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Jan M. Broekman

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Jan M. Broekman

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Jan M. Broekman

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Rob van Gestel and Andreas Lienhard

The overall aim of this book is to gain a broader overview of the practices, policies, methods and criteria applied in the evaluation of academic legal research in Europe. To this end, we have asked experts from 111 European countries to describe the evaluation practices of legal publications in different contexts, such as the scrutiny by journals and publishers, PhD committees, funding bodies and national research assessment exercises. In addition, we have included a chapter on the EU context in research evaluation because it increasingly affects how research quality is perceived throughout Europe. We were curious to learn to what extent there is consensus about how the ‘quality’ of legal research is determined in a range of countries with different histories, traditions and (academic) legal cultures. In most of the European countries we studied, some similar questions arise regarding the evaluation of academic legal research publications. Institutions for higher education witness growing pressure to develop suitable procedures to evaluate their research. Additionally, increased requirements of accountability for research institutions and researchers to funding bodies have forced researchers and university man¬agers to address this topic.

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Rob van Gestel and Andreas Lienhard

Who are the best legal scholars in Europe in different fields of law? Which journals are considered the best in Europe and what sorts of assessment methods do editorial boards and publishers apply when evaluating manu¬scripts? These are but a few of the questions that are difficult to answer for legal academics, university managers and funding bodies. To outsiders, these kinds of questions might seem trivial, because in most other (social) sciences many scholars know each other’s h-index, there are official rankings of journals and publishers, and editorial boards are quite clear about the standards they apply for (single or double blind) peer review. In law, however, all this is different. Not only do legal academics in Europe publish a wide variety of articles, essays, books, commentaries, case notes and so on, in a broad range of languages, about a wide variety of national legal systems; but unlike scholars in the hard sciences, they also address multiple audiences. The readership of legal scholars ranges from other academics to courts, solicitors, legislators and so on. Without realizing it, the absence of uniform evaluation practices for academic legal publications may have unexpected consequences.