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Monica Forret, Diana Smrt, Sherry E. Sullivan, Shawn M. Carraher and Jennifer L. Schultz

In this chapter, we feature several exercises that help students understand the value of HR/HRM: What it is, why it’s important, and the need for thinking of HR strategically. Importantly, several of these exercises have an artistic/visual component, which may aid in reorienting HRM from a policing/reactive function to one that is more strategic and proactive. One uses pictures that convey HR practices, while another asks students to draw a picture that represents the HR culture of their organization. There is also an exercise that makes use of a new approach to slide presentations throughout the semester. Groups are encouraged to create and deliver Pecha Kucha presentations (20 slides, automatically timed at 20 seconds each, for a total of six minutes and 40 seconds) on current events in HR. This activity encourages group members to operate as facilitators in ways that intensify deep thinking and engagement and, at the same time, requires students to be succinct and apposite.

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Gama Perruci and Sadhana W. Hall

When reviewing the promotional materials of most colleges and universities in the United States, we are hard pressed to find any without the use of the word “leader” or “leadership.” Yet, when we delve deeper into their catalogues and websites, the numbers dwindle. Teaching leadership goes beyond mission statements in which leadership is articulated. This chapter reviews the evolution of teaching leadership and its place in higher education. We approach the teaching of leadership as having three conceptual approaches – as an intellectual enterprise (the study of leadership), a focus on competency-building (leadership training), and the promotion of leadership development. We frame the teaching of leadership through four levels of analysis – individual, team/community, organizational, and global. At the end of the chapter, we combine these two perspectives (the three conceptual approaches and the four levels of analysis) to create an overarching map of the different topics that are used in the teaching of leadership.

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Anna B. Kayes, David M. Kaplan, Jane Burdett and Sharon L. O'Sullivan

Once employees have been hired, it cannot be assumed that they will flourish in their jobs. Job specifications – even ones that have been recently updated – will change as the competitive landscape changes, and employees’ skills need continually to be assessed, developed, and managed. How organizations develop their talents, especially in knowledge work environments, is key to organizational competitiveness: being able to compete in a constantly changing, global marketplace and ensuring employees continue to grow and develop in their careers. Featured among these exercises are one two which enable students to develop a training plan, another which requires critical thinking to discover what went wrong in such a process, and the first which takes a broad look at the war on talent.

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Gama Perruci and Sadhana W. Hall

Students need to develop vibrant networks of mentors from whom they can seek input for problems they face or decisions they need to make. By leaning on their support networks, leaders are able to make the best decision possible with all the data related to an issue they are trying to resolve. This chapter covers the many different ways an educator can approach student growth and guidance and how mentorship and networks can play a role. First, mentorship is defined through a review of the current literature, followed by an examination of the benefits of mentorship to mentors and mentees alike. The chapter provides examples of mentoring programs that students have found useful and outlines lessons learned as a result of program implementation. The chapter ends with an examination of the concept of networking and how it can support personal and professional growth.

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Gama Perruci and Sadhana W. Hall

Much has been written about the use of technology in the classroom. The term “smart” has become associated with a technology-enhanced classroom. In this chapter, we offer a different take on the term “‘smart’ classroom.” A “smart” classroom is one in which the educator and the learners alike engage in a transformative process. Technology may be part of that process, but it is not an end in itself. In the first section of the chapter, we examine the assumptions we make about the term “‘smart’ classroom.” The second section of the chapter introduces strategies that educators can use to increase learner engagement in the classroom (e.g., the Socratic method, use of artifacts, case studies). The chapter closes with an examination of “nontraditional” approaches to leadership pedagogy, for example service-learning projects, simulations, the flipped classroom, and the “mobile” classroom.

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Lisa T. Stickney, Alexander L. A. Crossman, Joanna Crossman and Lydia Richards

In the U.S. alone, on average 13 employees die each day in workplace accidents. The industry which tops the list – construction – accounts for nearly 20 percent of workplace deaths. Ideally, workplaces are designed and maintained to be safe. However, workplace safety goes beyond construction accidents, or even the slip/fall common in food service. More work is done by knowledge workers, and with more employees spending increasingly more time at a computer, we are seeing a growing incidence of carpal tunnel syndrome and other issues related to the sedentary nature of work. Workplace safety, housed within Human Resources, is concerned with employees’ safety and well-being, and works to prevent and resolve safety-related issues. The exercises which follow will be of interest to faculty and students alike.

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David M. Kaplan, Julie Palmer, Katina Thompson, Susan Dustin, Christina Arroyo, Sanjeewa Perera and Robert D. Marx

Once a job is evaluated and designed the process for filling the position begins. Decisions to be made include: determining the labor needs both now and in the future, where to advertise the job, whether to look internally first, what kind of special considerations might be made, and the criteria for selection. While this may sound simple, there is a mountain of research that demonstrates biases – both conscious and unconscious – that get in the way of making the best selection decisions. Included in this chapter are several exercises that enable students to experience the challenges of hiring employees, including special cases where diversity, overqualification, and group roles in decision-making processes are potential issues.

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Gama Perruci and Sadhana W. Hall

Leadership programming is at the core of leadership education, training, and development. In this chapter, we describe how to conceptualize and develop co-curricular leadership programming. First, steps should be taken to identify and understand the target population for the program. Then educators should assess the available resources and assemble a team of similarly motivated individuals to assist in the development process. From there, research should be conducted to help further conceptualize the program. Finally, educators should establish initial program goals and SMART student learning outcomes for their program to ensure that the needs of both the students and the educators will be fulfilled by the proposed design. The chapter provides a systematic path forward based on seven core pillars of program design.

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Gama Perruci and Sadhana W. Hall

Leadership educators should create a robust program assessment and evaluation culture at the launch of a leadership program. Ideally, such a culture promotes an ethos of continuous quality improvement and evidence-based decision-making. The data and information it yields form the basis for understanding the program’s achievement of goals and its impact. It helps educators to determine how well the content is advancing student learning and how program results satisfy the interests of key stakeholders. An evidence-based plan that measures learning, satisfaction, and program efficiency can play a critical role in promoting the program and providing funding justification to donors. This chapter presents a systematic assessment framework that thrives on a culture of continuous quality improvement and can be implemented within a single program or across multiple programs.

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Gama Perruci and Sadhana W. Hall

Excellent leadership programs are developed through rigorous attention to detail. Well-designed sessions convey the educator’s dedication to the material and respect for the learners’ time and effort. Put simply, by intentionally crafting and organizing each session, educators communicate a devotion to doing things right, which puts them well on their way to establishing trust, credibility, and respect as stepping-stones to leadership. This chapter begins with a general overview of the components of effective session design as follows: assessing audience maturity level and readiness; establishing SMART learning outcomes; identifying key concepts; incorporating leadership categories and competencies; outlining content and roles; and creating time for reflection. With a session design in place, the chapter focuses on logistical considerations for its implementation, including some tools used for organizing sessions within a program.