Browse by title

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 4,140 items :

  • Asian Studies x
  • Chapters/Articles x
Clear All Modify Search
This content is available to you

David Boje and Grace A. Rosile

You do not have access to this content

Gerald Chan

You do not have access to this content

Nengye Liu

Henry Kissinger, in his book World Order, describes order as: “The concept held by a region or civilization about the nature of just arrangements and the distribution of power thought to be applicable to the entire world” (Kissinger, 2015: 9). The United States of America, together with its Western allies, constructed the existing rules-based order that has governed the world since the Second World War. International law is at the core of the rules-based international order (Scott, 2017). However, who determines the law-making agenda and the allocation of resources to law-making is crucial for the development of international law (Boyle and Chinkin, 2007). That is to say, shifting power within the international community may eventually materialize in changing international law. It is therefore very interesting to observe the rise of Asian powers, especially China, and its implications for the future of global governance

This content is available to you

Edited by Chih Y. Woon and Klaus Dodds

Open access

Florian Weigand

This content is available to you

Edited by Songshan Huang and Ganghua Chen

This content is available to you

Edited by Songshan Huang and Ganghua Chen

This content is available to you

Katja Levy and Knut B. Pissler

This content is available to you

Ernest J. Yanarella and Richard S. Levine