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Scott M. Aquanno

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Scott M. Aquanno

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Scott M. Aquanno

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Scott M. Aquanno

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Scott M. Aquanno

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Nattapon Tantrakoonsab and Wannarat Tantrakoonsab

In the past five years, exports of Thai durian have been increasing consistently, dominating the Chinese market. In this study, key informant interviews and analyses of the secondary data revealed changes that affect durian exports, including increasing Chinese demand, the emergence of new durian planting areas, the expansion of the processed durian market, and transportation improvements in Mekong region countries. The empirical analysis also demonstrated that Chinese entrepreneurs have expanded their roles in the value chain to replace Thai entrepreneurs. Although farmers and packing plants may presently benefit from the increasing export volume of durian, concerns arise about the total value capture of the entirety of Thai stakeholders.

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Aungkana Kmonpetch and Waranya Jitpong

Longan is one of three largest tropical fruit export items in Thailand. Over the past decade, increased investment from China in packing houses in production areas has underpinned the tremendous growth of fresh longan exports to China. Reflecting on the trait of the Chinese market that puts less importance on credence attributes than on product attributes of fresh fruits, firms from outside the supply chain as well as incumbent downstream firms appear to have invested in packing houses. The rising number of packing houses, however, did not always translate to intensifying competition among them, which is represented by the stagnant farm gate price of longan. While it is evident that Chinese investment has boosted fresh longan exports to China, its ramifications on value capture of Thai stakeholders are uncertain.

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Edited by Mohammad B. Rana and Matthew M.C. Allen

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Peter A.G. van Bergeijk

Whether you want to be successful in life or want to beat the next pandemic, the key recipe will be the five Ps: prepare, prepare, prepare, prepare, prepare. COVID-19 reminded us that a virus cannot be stopped by border measures. Thus, Earth needs to prepare, prepare, prepare, prepare, prepare. We know that the next pandemic is coming, and that the frequency of pandemics is increasing. That is why the five Ps are vital.

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Peter A.G. van Bergeijk

The best description of the 'present' that I came across durng the COVID-19 pandemic is that of 'data fog'. Reality is always difficult to guage, but during the early phase of the Corona crisis this was especially difficult. We learned the hard way that the only certainty during a pandemic is uncertainty. Since the virus is new, its characteristics - in particular the speed by which it spreads and its severity and mortality - are unknown (and while we are on a steep learning curve much remains unclear). Therefore, epidemiological modelling is an art rather than a science, and that is true even though its approach is scientific, evidence-based and contains a lot of mathematics.