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Edited by Clive Walker, Mariona Llobet Anglí and Manuel C. Meliá

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Joanna Kyriakakis

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Wojciech Załuski

The philosophical basis of this book was the personalist view of human beings. I have provided several philosophical arguments in its favor, but one can add in this place also a pragmatic one, viz. there are some empirical findings which demonstrate that disbelief in free will (a crucial part of this view) leads to increased aggression, to increased tendency to lie and cheat, to decreased willingness to help others, and to conformist behavior (cf. Baumeister 2010). This pragmatic argument is obviously controversial and, even if true, of secondary importance; nonetheless it is undoubtedly worth mentioning. I have argued that several important consequences flow from the personalist view with regard to the insanity defense.

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Edited by Gaye T. Lansdell, Bernadette J. Saunders and Anna Eriksson

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Edited by Gaye T. Lansdell, Bernadette J. Saunders and Anna Eriksson

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Vishv P. Kohli

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Vishv P. Kohli

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Michael Ramsden

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Edited by Margaret deGuzman and Valerie Oosterveld

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Kerttuli Lingenfelter

The Lisbon Treaty consolidated, clarified and shifted the division of European Union competences in matters of criminal law. These are the developments that this chapter explores. Starting with the legal framework introduced by the Lisbon treaty, the chapter lays down both the conferred competences and the legal limits to them. The chapter then turns to the specifics of the Union’s procedural, institutional and substantive competences, elaborating upon the interplay between the competences in law and jurisprudence. To augment those parts of the legal texts that are not exhaustive, the chapter concludes by reflecting on the Court of Justice’s post-Lisbon jurisprudence on criminal competences, in which the Court has been attuning its doctrines to the challenges arising from the Lisbon legal framework for criminal justice.