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Philip H. Mirvis, Susan Albers Mohrman and Christopher G. Worley

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Philip H. Mirvis, Susan Albers Mohrman and Christopher G. Worley

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Bill Lee

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Bill Lee

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Edited by Wendy Murphy and Jennifer Tosti-Kharas

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Wendy Murphy and Jennifer Tosti-Kharas

The Handbook of Research Methods in Careers serves as a comprehensive introduction to the methodologies that researchers use in the careers domain. As a phenomenon of study, careers have unquestionably become more rich, dynamic, and complex than ever before. Our authors present their methods in detail and offer numerous actionable best practices, realistic previews, and even cautionary tales based on their vast collective experience publishing in this area. The Handbook showcases the diverse and interdisciplinary approaches to designing projects and studying careers across the spectrum of quantitative and qualitative methodologies. Together, the 57 authors who contributed to this Handbook represent institutions and organizations across 13 countries from a range of disciplinary training and an even wider range of national origins. The diversity inherent in our authorship reflects the diversity in careers research itself and provides further evidence of the rich heritage and future of the careers field.

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M. Rezaul Islam, Niaz Ahmed Khan, Siti Hajar Abu Bakar Ah, Haris Abd Wahab and Mashitah Binti Hamidi

Fieldwork/data collection is one of the most important parts in the research process, and it is particularly important for social sciences research. A number of aspects that need to be considered by a researcher before starting data collection include: ethical permission from the concerned ethical body/committee, informed consent, contract with different stakeholders, field settings, time allocation and time management, field leading, data collection, contextual and cultural diversities, community settings, socioeconomic and psychological patterns of the community, political pattern, rapport building between data collectors and respondents, permission to access community, language and mode of data collection, power relations, role of gatekeepers, privacy and confidentiality issues, layers of expectations among researchers/respondents/ funding organization, data recording (written, memorization, voice recording and video recording), and so on. Many aspects are very difficult to understand before going into the field. Sometimes, a researcher’s previous experience about a particular community may help to gain field access, but it may be difficult to assess the field in advance due to rapid changes within people’s livelihoods and other shifts in the community. The change of a political paradigm sometimes seems also to be a challenge at the field level. We believe that although technological innovation has benefited some aspects of the data collection of fieldwork in social research, many other dimensions (mentioned above) of fieldwork endure unchanged.

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Edited by Anna Spenceley

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Anna Spenceley

This comprehensive Handbook brings together practical advice from leading international practitioners in sustainable tourism. This guidance is not designed as a guide for long-term academic projects, but instead applies good research design principles within the parameters of modest timeframes and resources, to provide workable and rational step-by-step approaches to researching real-life challenges. The book’s contributors unpack how to undertake environmental, socio-cultural and economic assessments that establish the feasibility for new tourism ventures, or ascertain what impacts they have had over time. The book covers fundamentals for practitioners, such as how to conduct feasibility studies and business plans, and also addresses hot topics such as visitor management and overcrowding. The processes of transferring knowledge from academic research into practical applications are also addressed. This Handbook is critical for researchers at all levels, and particularly to those working within government institutions responsible for tourism and private tourism businesses. It is also an invaluable resource for practitioners, not-for-profit organizations and consultants that provide technical support in the planning, feasibility, development, operation and evaluation of sustainable tourism.

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Timothy G. Pollock