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Paul Nieuwenhuis, Daniel Newman and Anne Touboulic

Another example we would like to bring in is that of the food industry and how it has also become dominated by the mass production paradigm, especially in the West, and as such is highly unsustainable. Mass produced or industrialised food systems are interestingly often labelled as ‘conventional’ systems - as opposed to ‘alternative’ food systems which are discussed later in this section (Marsden et al., 2000; Sonnino and Marsden, 2006). Food is an interesting space to consider as humans will always need food to survive, yet what we are seeing nowadays is a deeply flawed production and consumption food system where food scarcity and poverty co-exist with over-production and over-consumption, which is in turn responsible for growing obesity and associated diseases. So how did we get to this?

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Paul Nieuwenhuis, Daniel Newman and Anne Touboulic

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Andrzej Wodecki

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Andrzej Wodecki

In this chapter we introduce main topics covered in this book, its motivation, and briefly describe the research methodology. We present the scope of each of the proceeding chapters, and comment on the most important bibliographical sources. I forms the ground for the Chapter 1, focused on fundamental concepts of Artificial Intelligence.

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John Humphrey

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John Humphrey

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Edited by Joseph Sarkis

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Julia Christensen Hughes

This chapter provides an overview of the conceptual development and measurement of employee engagement, beginning with the originating work of Kahn (1990). Critical reviews and contrasting suggestions for advancing the field are offered. Research findings from empirical studies on employee engagement in hospitality and tourism contexts are synthesized and applied to this debate.

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Andrew Jenkins

Older workers are an increasingly important source of labour for the hospitality industry. As a result of an ageing population and declining fertility rates in most countries, resulting in a smaller pool of younger people in the labour market, the hospitality industry’s traditional reliance on younger workers needs to be re-evaluated. Attracting, retaining and developing older employees is a key employment issue facing hospitality businesses. In order to address this issue, hospitality employers will need to confront workplace inequality faced by older workers and develop policies and practices to promote the health and wellbeing of their older workers. Negative stereotypical attitudes towards older workers, such as resistance to change, inability to assimilate technological developments and physical and cognitive decline need to be challenged. The chapter examines the barriers facing older employees in the hospitality industry and ways to reduce and, where possible, eliminate these barriers.