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Creating Competitiveness

Entrepreneurship and Innovation Policies for Growth

Edited by David B. Audretsch and Mary Lindenstein Walshok

Although competitiveness is typically associated with firms, they are not the only organizational body whose performance is dependent upon competitiveness. This poignant insightful book focuses on how the varied economic performance of cities and regions, both within nations as well as across nations, during the era of the ‘Great Recession’ also highlights the need for competitiveness.
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Sylvie Laforet

Innovation in Small Family Businesses explores how innovation is developed and carried out in small family-owned businesses, the factors underpinning it, and the innovation drivers and barriers in these firms’ context. Sylvie Laforet also offers suggestions on how innovation can be fostered and perhaps, sustained in small family-owned businesses and discusses the government’s role in this. The book makes an important contribution to the theoretical development of family firms’ and small businesses’ innovation.
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Edited by Claudio Petti

Bringing technologies to the market, thereby creating profits, high-qualified jobs and industrial upgrading is one of the means by which China can fuel its brand new growth model based on innovation and sustainability. Much is known about the mechanisms of technological entrepreneurship. But how does this happen in China? Who is doing what? Is there a ‘Chinese way’ to do technological entrepreneurship? This thought-provoking book provides readers with a closer look at these issues and clarifies them through a number of case studies discussed from the perspectives of both Chinese and international contributors.
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Dariusz Jemielniak

This critical ethnographic study of knowledge workers and knowledge-intensive organization workplaces focuses on the issues of timing and schedules, the perception of formality and trust and distrust in software development as well as motivation and occupational identity among software engineers.