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Cristina D. Checherita-Westphal

This compelling research review touches on the contemporary debates in macroeconomics that have consequentially emerged as a result of government debt. Should governments tolerate high public debt or become more indebted given the now prevailing low interest rates? Or is high public debt bad for private sector confidence and growth, by feeding uncertainty, expectation of future tax hikes and an imminent collapse in the wake of the next crisis? This review presents a collection of articles reflecting on these complex and intriguing topics. This review will be useful for policy makers and academics alike, while being particularly suited for those wishing to explore this exciting research area further.
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Bruce A. Blonigen and Thomas J. Prusa

Antidumping trade protection is one of the most frequent and ubiquitous trade policies in the global economy. This review discusses the key reference pieces in the antidumping literature that have critically defined and shaped what we know about this important and unique form of trade protection. The review critically analyzes the literature and discusses its future directions – it is an important research tool not only for new and established scholars in international economics, but also policymakers and legal scholars.
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Alexander W. Cappelen and Bertil Tungodden

A growing literature in economics has studied how fairness considerations shape human behavior. This review analyses the key theoretical and empirical contributions spanning the last four decades, along with influential related work in normative economics. It argues that the fairness motive is essential for understanding human behavior in a wide range of settings, such as markets, bargaining, and redistributive situations. It moves on to a discussion of the large heterogeneity in what people view as fair and the importance people attach to fairness, displaying how a concern for fairness develops in childhood and manifests itself in the brain. This research review will be a valuable tool for those interested in the fascinating field of the economics of fairness.
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Agents, Assumptions and Motivations Behind REDD+

Creating an International Forest Regime

Simone Lovera-Bilderbeek

​It was hoped that by paying forest dependent peoples and countries for their “service” of conserving their forests, REDD+ would lead to a reduction in deforestation greenhouse gases. The complexities have, however, left some ambiguities. It was never agreed who would pay for the program, and it has been criticized as ignoring the root causes of forest loss. Considering the motivations of those who promoted REDD+ this book proposes remedies to its shortfalls and recommends more efficient, equitable and effective conservation policies.
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Climate Change and Catastrophe Management in a Changing China

Government, Insurance and Alternatives

Qihao He

China is the largest greenhouse gas emitter in the world and also suffers from devastating climate catastrophes. Increasingly, policymakers in China have come to realize that government alone cannot adequately prevent or defray climate-related disaster risks. This book contends that a better way to manage catastrophe risk in China is through private insurance rather than directly through the Chinese government. In addition, private insurance could function as a substitute for, or complement to, government regulation of catastrophe risks by causing policyholders to take greater precautions to reduce climate change risks.
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Edited by Olivier Moréteau, Aniceto Masferrer and Kjell A. Modéer

The specially commissioned papers in this book lay a solid theoretical foundation for comparative legal history as a distinct academic discipline. While facilitating a much needed dialogue between comparatists and legal historians, this research handbook examines methodologies in this emerging field and reconsiders legal concepts and institutions like custom, civil procedure, and codification from a comparative legal history perspective.
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Contesting Human Rights

Norms, Institutions and Practice

Edited by Alison Brysk and Michael Stohl

Illustrated with case studies from across the globe, Contesting Human Rights provides an innovative approach to human rights, and examines the barriers and changing pathways to the full realisation of these rights. Presenting a thorough proposal for the reframing of human rights, the volume suggests that new opportunities at, and below, the state level, and creative pathways of global governance can help reconstruct human rights in the face of modern challenges.
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Edited by Ronald J. Burke and Astrid M. Richardsen

Workplaces can often be sources of stress, interfering with both job satisfaction and performance. This book explores ways to combat the factors contributing to an unhealthy workplace by building on the advances in positive psychology and organizational scholarship over the last 15 years.
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Developing Bus Rapid Transit

The Value of BRT in Urban Spaces

Edited by Fiona Ferbrache

Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) is a popular mode of sustainable public urban transit given dedicated focus in this timely collection. The effects of BRT are examined in-depth through a range of case studies from cities across six continents, including analysis of BRT planning, implementation, operation, performance and impacts. The contributions from academics and non-academic experts on BRT are framed more broadly within the concept of value and how urban transport investment has and can be valued by and for society.
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Economics as Anatomy

Radical Innovation in Empirical Economics

G. M.P. Swann

For most of his career, Peter Swann’s main research interest has been the economics of innovation. But he has also been preoccupied with a second question: what is the best way to study empirical economics? In this book, he uses his knowledge of the first question to answer the second. There are two fundamentally different approaches to innovation: incremental innovation and radical innovation – ‘radical’ in the sense that we go back to the ‘roots’ of empirical economics and take a different tack. An essential lesson from the economics of innovation is that we need both incremental and radical innovation for the maximum beneficial effect on the economy. Swann argues that the same is true for economics as a discipline. This book is a much-awaited sequel to Putting Econometrics in its Place which explored what other methods should be used, and why. This book is about the best way of organising the economics discipline, to ensure that it pursues this wide variety of methods to maximum effect.