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Understanding Ponzi Schemes

Can Better Financial Regulation Prevent Investors from Being Defrauded?

Mervyn K. Lewis

A Ponzi scheme is one of the simplest, albeit effective, financial frauds to engineer, and new schemes keep coming forward. Despite this, however, people continue to invest in them. How are we to account for the seemingly never-ending lure of such schemes? In providing answers to this central question, this concise and well-researched book examines how Ponzi schemes operate, how they differ from pyramid schemes, Ponzi finance and other financial arrangements.
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Michael Haliassos

Since its emergence in the 1980s, the subject of household finance has rapidly grown into a critical area of economic focus. Research, policy and practitioner interest has increased as household portfolios have become more complicated in response to financial innovation and new challenges in retirement financing. Whilst the earliest research was initially focussed on the limited tendency to hold stocks and diversify risk, recent work has developed into a broader exploration of the challenges posed by limited financial literacy, cognition, behavioural biases and cultural predispositions, and the ways to overcome them through financial education, advice, institutional reform and regulation. In this research review Professor Haliassos explores the most essential papers on the subject comprehensively.
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Jonathan D. Ostry, Atish R. Ghosh and Mahvash S. Qureshi

The global financial crisis and its aftermath saw boom-bust cycles in cross-border capital flows of astounding magnitude. Issues of capital account liberalization and the imposition of capital controls are back in the headlines, and on researchers’ agendas. This comprehensive and timely research review covers many of the themes central to the issue of capital account liberalization, and provides a balanced assessment of the role that capital controls might play in the effective management of capital flows to reap their benefits.
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The Challenge of Economic Rebalancing in Europe

Perspectives for CESEE Countries

Edited by Ewald Nowotny, Doris Ritzberger-Grünwald and Helene Schuberth

In the long aftermath of the acute global financial crisis of 2008/09, “rebalancing” the economy with new sources of growth and productivity remains a persistent necessity. This book addresses the resulting trade-offs and challenges. These needs, and the corresponding policy challenges, are especially prevalent in Europe, in particular Central, Eastern and South-Eastern Europe. On this issue, this book contributes lessons learned from earlier balance sheet recessions. It also addresses the often overlooked link between macroeconomic imbalances and economic inequality. Further contributions focus on the interaction between monetary policy and financial stability, adding a regional perspective to these important issues.
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Sajid M. Chaudhry, Andrew W. Mullineux and Natasha Agarwal

This concise book gives a unique overview of bank taxation as an alternative or a compliment to prudential regulation or non-revenue taxation. Existing bank taxation is reviewed with a view to eliminating distortions in the tax system, which have incentivized banks to engage in risky activities in the past. The authors analyse the taxation of financial instruments trading, as well as the taxation of banking products and services to gauge whether this could finance resolution mechanisms and also help to ensure the stability of banks.
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The Demise of Finance-dominated Capitalism

Explaining the Financial and Economic Crises

Edited by Eckhard Hein, Daniel Detzer and Nina Dodig

This book provides an overview of different theoretical perspectives on the long-run transition towards finance-dominated capitalism, on the implications for macroeconomic and financial stability, and ultimately on the recent global financial and economic crisis. In the first part, the macroeconomics of finance-dominated capitalism, the theories of financial crisis and important past crises are reviewed. The second part deals with the 2007-09 financial and economic crisis in particular. The special focus is on the long-run problems and inconsistencies of finance-dominated capitalism which played a key role in the crisis and its level of severity.
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Monetary Regimes and Inflation

History, Economic and Political Relationships, Second Edition

Peter Bernholz

Exploring the characteristics of inflations and comparing historical cases from Roman times up to the modern day, this book provides an in depth discussion of the subject. It analyses the high and moderate inflations caused by the inflationary bias of political systems and economic relationships, as well as the importance of different monetary regimes in containing them. The differences for the possible size of inflations among monetary regimes like metallic currencies, the gold standard and fiat paper money are discussed. It is shown that huge budget deficits of government have been responsible for all hyperinflations. This revised second edition debates whether a growth of the money supply exceeding that of real Gross Domestic Production is a necessary or sufficient reason for inflation and also includes a new concluding chapter, which explores the long-term tendencies to create, maintain and abolish inflation-stable monetary regimes. Moreover, the conditions for long-term inflation-stable monetary regimes in history are explored.
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New Global Economic Architecture

The Asian Perspective

Edited by Masahiro Kawai, Peter J. Morgan and Pradumna B. Rana

The global financial crisis of 2007-2009 exposed flaws and shortcomings in the global economic architecture, and has sparked an international debate about possible remedies for them. The postwar global architecture was essentially guided by the major developed economies, and was centered around the IMF, the GATT – the predecessor of the WTO – and the World Bank. Today, however, the balance of economic and financial power is shifting toward the emerging economies, especially those in Asia, and both global governance and economic policy thinking are beginning to reflect this shift. This book addresses the important question of how a regional architecture, particularly one in Asia, can induce a supply of regional public goods that can complement and strengthen the global public goods supplied through the global architecture. These public goods include institutions to help maintain financial stability, support more open trading regimes and promote sustainable economic development.