Browse by title

You are looking at 1 - 2 of 2 items :

  • Competition Policy x
  • Economics and Finance x
  • Economics 2016 x
Clear All Modify Search
You do not have access to this content

Competition Policies and Consumer Welfare

Corporate Strategies and Consumer Prices in Developing Countries

Edited by Lahcen Achy and Susan Joekes

The fundamental goal of competition law is to support productivity and innovativeness; in fact, the short-term effect of enforcement actions is often a reduction in product prices. This book reports the findings of consumer market studies into a range of goods and services in developing countries in Africa, Asia and Latin America. It finds a pervasive lack of competition in those markets, which not only reduces the standard of living of consumers, including poor and vulnerable groups, but also softens the incentives on firms to improve the efficiency of their operations and the quality of their products
You do not have access to this content

F.M. Scherer

Please note this updated and revised Research Review is only available online. The link to Buy Book in Print and Find This Book in Your Library is to a previous edition available in print. The previous print edition reprints the full text of many, though not all, of the Recommended Articles and complements the online edition. This review draws on a collection of seminal writings dealing with the development of competition policy in Europe, the United States and Japan. It begins by discussing the writings of leading philosophers and scholars on the rationale and desirability of competition in market economies. These interpretations range in time of origin from ancient Greece through to Adam Smith and James Madison to very recent contributions in the competition policy debate. Having established relevant philosophical foundations, the review offers analyses by leading British, American, German and Japanese scholars on the interpretation and administration of laws concerning price-fixing and other restrictive agreements, market dominance and monopolization, predatory practices and mergers.