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Shaping China’s Innovation Future

University Technology Transfer in Transition

John L. Orcutt and Hong Shen

Shaping China’s Innovation Future employs a thorough analysis of a combination of factors including: the role of law and China’s legal system; economic theory and the development of China’s economy; China’s educational, intellectual property, and financial systems; China’s innovation capacity; and Chinese culture. Though the recommendations on how to improve China’s technology commercialization system are unique to China, the scope of the research makes the conclusions found here applicable to other countries facing similar challenges.
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Imitation to Innovation in China

The Role of Patents in Biotechnology and Pharmaceutical Industries

Yahong Li

Following decades in which China’s approach to technology has been to imitate, the country is now transforming itself to become innovation-oriented. This pioneering study examines whether patents play a similar role in promoting innovation in China as they do in the West, exploring the interplay between patents and China’s biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries in particular.
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Edited by Kuk Cho

This informative book provides an overview of the law and judicial institutions pertaining to litigation in Korea, as well as a selection of important court decisions.
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Community and the Law

A Critical Reassessment of American Liberalism and Japanese Modernity

Takao Tanase

Edited by Luke Nottage and Leon Wolff

This important book translates seven landmark essays by one of Japan’s most respected and influential legal thinkers. While Takao Tanase concedes that law might not matter as much in Japan as it does in the United States, in a provocative challenge to socio-legal researchers and comparative lawyers, he asks: why should it? The issue, he contends, is not whether law matters to society; it is how society matters to law.
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Corporate Governance in the 21st Century

Japan’s Gradual Transformation

Edited by Luke Nottage, Leon Wolff and Kent Anderson

The ‘lost decade’ of economic stagnation in Japan during the 1990s has become a ‘found decade’ for regulatory and institutional reform. Nowhere is this more evident than in corporate law. In 2005, for example, a spate of reforms to the Commercial Code culminated in the new Company Act, a statute promising greater organisational flexibility and shareholder empowerment for Japanese corporations competing in a more globalised economy. But does this new law herald a more ‘Americanised’ system of corporate governance? Has Japan embraced shareholder primacy over its traditional loyalty to other key stakeholders such as ‘main banks’, core employees, and partners within diffuse corporate (keiretsu) groups? This book argues that a more complex ‘gradual transformation’ is unfolding in Japan – a process evident in many other post-industrial economies.
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Edited by Thomas Eger, Michael Faure and Zhang Naigen

This book comprises contributions on recent developments in China from a law and economics perspective. For the first time Chinese and European scholars jointly discuss some important attributes of China’s legal and economic system, and some recent problems, from this particular viewpoint.
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Intellectual Property and TRIPS Compliance in China

Chinese and European Perspectives

Edited by Paul Torremans, Hailing Shan and Johan Erauw

China’s accession to the WTO and TRIPS heralded massive changes in Chinese intellectual property (IP) law. This book asks whether all aspects of Chinese law and practice are now TRIPs compliant. The study offers both Chinese and European perspectives.