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Religion and Finance

Comparing the Approaches of Judaism, Christianity and Islam

Mervyn K. Lewis and Ahmad Kaleem

Judaism, Christianity and Islam all impose obligations and constraints upon the rightful use of wealth and earthly resources. All three of these religions have well-researched views on the acceptability of practices such as usury but the principles and practices of other, non-interest, financial instruments are less well known. This book examines each of these three major world faiths, considering their teachings, social precepts and economic frameworks, which are set out as a guide for the financial dealings and economic behaviour of their adherents.
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Islamic Wealth Management

Theory and Practice

Edited by Mohamed Ariff and Shamsher Mohamad

From an Islamic perspective, although the ownership of wealth is with God, humans are gifted with wealth to manage it with the objective of benefiting the human society. Such guidance means that wealth management is a process involving the accumulation, generation, purification, preservation and distribution of wealth, all to be conducted carefully in permissible ways. This book is the first to lay out a coherent framework on how wealth management should be conducted in compliance with guiding principles from edicts of a major world religion.
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Edited by M. Kabir Hassan

In Islamic jurisprudence, a comprehensive ethic has been formulated governing how business and commerce should be run, how accountability to God and the community is to be achieved, and how banking and finance is to be arranged. This Handbook examines how well these values are translated into actual performance. It explores whether those holding true to the system are hindered and put at a disadvantage or whether the Islamic institutions have been able to demonstrate that faith-based activities can be rewarding, both economically and spiritually.
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Takaful and Islamic Cooperative Finance

Challenges and Opportunities

Edited by S. Nazim Ali and Shariq Nisar

Islamic finance distinguishes itself from conventional finance with its strong emphasis on the moral consequences of financial transactions; prohibiting interest, excessive uncertainty, and finance of harmful business. When it comes to risk mitigation, it is unique in its risk sharing approach.
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Akhand Akhtar Hossain

This book reviews key aspects of central banking and monetary policy in selected Muslim-majority countries. While reviewing country-specific experiences and issues in inflation and monetary policy, and analysing them from an historical context, emphasis is given to the evolution of Islamic banking and finance and the consequent institutional developments for maintaining price stability. One recurring theme is that, although Islamic banking and finance may have created some complexities, it remains consistent with Classical monetary theory and has created opportunities for improving the infrastructure of central banks and monetary policy to maintain both price and economic stability. The introduction of Islamic banking and finance strengthens the argument for low and stable inflation and rule-based monetary policy. Monetary policy frameworks in these countries include exchange-rate pegging, monetary targeting and inflation targeting under varied restrictions on capital flows. Macroeconomic problems under these regimes are also highlighted and their policy implications drawn.
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Edited by M. Kabir Hassan and Mervyn K. Lewis

Handbook on Islam and Economic Life is a unique study, one of the first of its kind to consider Islam within a broader economic sphere. Covering a wide breadth of topics and research, it explores how Islam impinges upon and seeks to shape major aspects of economic life including economic organisation, business and management, finance and investment, charity, mutuality and self-help, and government. It concludes by analysing the link between religion and development, the present economic situation in Arab countries and the causes of underdevelopment in Muslim countries.
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History of Islamic Economic Thought

Contributions of Muslim Scholars to Economic Thought and Analysis

Abdul Azim Islahi

This unique book highlights the contributions made by Muslim scholars to economic thought throughout history, a topic that has received relatively little attention in mainstream economics. Abdul Azim Islahi discusses various ways in which Muslim ideas reached the European West, influencing scholars and helping to form the foundations of modern economic ideas and theories.
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Murat Çizakça

This research review discusses the work of some of the finest minds in comparative economic / financial history and modern Islamic finance. It pinpoints articles that focus on the rise, the decline and the contemporary efforts to regenerate Islamic capitalism, the contribution of classical Muslim scholars to the history of economic thought, the institutions that translated these ideas into everyday life and whether these thoughts and institutions constitute a clash or a symbiosis of civilizations. The efforts of contemporary Muslim thinkers to design a modern Islamic economy are also carefully scrutinized. The review will be welcomed by all those with an historical or contemporary interest in Islamic studies.
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Muhammad Umer Chapra

Mankind is faced with a number of serious problems that demand an effective solution. The prevalence of injustice and the frequency of financial crises are two of the most serious of these problems. Consisting of an in-depth introduction along with a selection of eight of Muhammad Umer Chapra's essays – four on Islamic economics and four on Islamic finance – this timely book raises the question of what can be done to not only minimize the frequency and severity of the financial crises, but also make the financial system more equitable.
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Edited by Mervyn K. Lewis, Mohamed Ariff and Shamsher Mohamad

From a single product offering in 1963, the Islamic financial services industry has grown to an estimated $1.6 trillion in assets. Products must comply with profit and risk-sharing criteria and regulations preventing banks from venturing into activities with high risk and excessive uncertainty. This timely volume analyses these matters and considers the range of new products, discussing both conceptual and practical dimensions. It connects Islamic finance to the mainstream theoretical literature on financial intermediation while also exploring its differences. The expert contributors also examine why an ethical foundation is important and why the system requires well-thought-out regulations to ensure outcomes that protect the community’s well-being.