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The Evaluation of Complex Infrastructure Projects

A Guide to Qualitative Comparative Analysis

Lasse Gerrits and Stefan Verweij

Infrastructure projects are notoriously hard to manage so it is important that society learns from the successes and mistakes made over time. However, most evaluation methods run into a conundrum: either they cover a large number of projects but have little to say about their details, or they focus on detailed single-case studies with little in terms of applicability elsewhere. This book presents Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA) as an alternative evaluation method that solves the conundrum to enhance learning.
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Business, Organized Labour and Climate Policy

Forging a Role at the Negotiating Table

Peter J. Glynn, Timothy Cadman and Tek N. Maraseni

This impartial study analyses the role of employer’s organisations and trade unions in climate change policy and its impacts on the labour market. The policies of government to manage greenhouse gas emissions will require business to change its product and service delivery arrangements, which in turn means labour requirements will also change. The book also considers whether labour market issues should be explicit in the theoretical framework of ecological modernisation as it guides the policy development process.
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Richard O. Zerbe Jr.

Benefit–cost analysis is at heart a subject of practicality and usefulness. With this in mind, the author has chosen to discuss the most relevant previously published articles. Having explored the theoretical and ethical underpinnings of the subject, the research review then addresses some major policy issues and debates. These include the institutional arrangements through which benefit–cost analyses would be most useful to the policy and decision process, the need for a set of principles and standards to unify benefit–cost analysis methods, the use of general equilibrium analysis and the proper treatment of uncertainty and risk.