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Public Policy, Productive and Unproductive Entrepreneurship

The Impact of Public Policy on Entrepreneurial Outcomes

Edited by Gregory M. Randolph, Michael T. Tasto and Robert F. Salvino Jr.

This exciting book provides fresh insight into how institutions, governments, regulations, economic freedom and morality impact entrepreneurship and public policy. Each chapter contains a rigorous analysis of the consequences of public policy and the effects of institutional decisions on the productivity of entrepreneurs. These chapters will help policymakers direct their efforts at creating a positive economic environment for entrepreneurs to flourish and for scholars to better understand the role policy plays on entrepreneurial activity.
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Edited by Robert F. Salvino Jr., Michael T. Tasto and Gregory M. Randolph

Examining the economics of entrepreneurship from the perspectives of productive versus unproductive entrepreneurial behavior and the role of institutions in economic outcomes, the authors in this book seek to advance the research on institutions by providing a simple framework to analyze the broader, long-term consequences of economic policies. They examine the relationship between economic freedom and economic outcomes and summarize empirical evidence and theory. The book also provides practical policy solutions that are based on the authors' cogent analyses.
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Employees and Entrepreneurship

Co-ordination and Spontaneity in Non-Hierarchical Business Organizations

Ivan Pongracic Jr.

Over the last few decades, there has been a great deal of management literature recommending the removal of firms’ hierarchies and the empowerment of employees. Ivan Pongracic, Jr. examines these themes through the lense of the economic theory of the firm. Balancing the tendency for management literature to overlook basic costs and trade-offs of decentralization, and the rigidity of economics that hinders an appreciation for the real world phenomenon of decentralization, this book arrives at a realistic middle ground between the two extremes. The dance between hierarchy and employee empowerment exists in even the most hierarchical firms, and this book explores this often overlooked dynamic.