Browse by title

You are looking at 1 - 3 of 3 items :

  • Financial Economics and Regulation x
  • Economics and Finance x
  • Sociology and Sociological Theory x
Clear All Modify Search
You do not have access to this content

Financial Models and Society

Villains or Scapegoats?

Ekaterina Svetlova

This innovative book employs the social studies of finance approach which aims to enhance the dialogue between finance and sociology by addressing the blind spots of economic and financial theories. In so doing, it challenges the accusations made towards financial models in the aftermath of the last economic crisis and argues that they cannot be condemned indiscriminately. Their influence on markets and society is not straightforward, but determined by the many ways in which models are created and then used. Ekaterina Svetlova analyses the various patterns of the application of models in asset management, risk management and financial engineering to demonstrate that their power is far more fragile than widespread criticism would indicate.
You do not have access to this content

Housing Markets and the Global Financial Crisis

The Uneven Impact on Households

Edited by Ray Forrest and Ngai-Ming Yip

Housing markets are at the centre of the recent global financial turmoil. In this well-researched study, a multidisciplinary group of leading analysts explores the impact of the crisis within, and between, countries.
You do not have access to this content

The Future of Futures

The Time of Money in Financing and Society

Elena Esposito

This book reconstructs the dynamics of economics, beginning explicitly with the role and the relevance of time: money uses the future in order to generate present wealth. Financial markets sell and buy risk, thereby binding the future. Elena Esposito explains that complex risk management techniques of structured finance produce new and uncontrolled risks because they use a simplified idea of the future, failing to account for how the future reacts to attempts at controlling it. During the recent financial crisis, the future had already been used (through securitizations, derivatives and other tools) to the extent that we had many futures, but no open future available.