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Edited by Christoph Scherrer

This book asks the important question of whether public banks are a better alternative to profit-seeking private banks. Do public banks provide finance for development? Do they serve as stability anchors in financial markets? What kind of governance keeps public banks accountable to the public? Theoretically the book draws on the works of Minsky for the question on stability and on interpretative policy analysis for the issue of governance. It compares empirically three countries with significant public banks: Brazil, Germany, and India.
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The Future of Federalism

Intergovernmental Financial Relations in an Age of Austerity

Edited by Richard Eccleston and Rick Krever

The crisis and its aftermath had a dramatic short-term effect on federal relations and, as the twelve case studies in this volume show, set in place a new set of socio-political factors that are shaping the longer-run process of institutional evolution and adaptation in federal systems. This illuminating book illustrates how an understanding of these complex dynamics is crucial to the development of policies needed for effective and sustainable federal governance in the twenty-first century.​
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State and Local Financial Instruments

Policy Changes and Management

Craig L. Johnson, Martin J. Luby and Tima T. Moldogaziev

The ability of a nation to finance its basic infrastructure is essential to its economic well-being in the 21st century. This book covers the municipal securities market in the United States from the perspective of its primary capital financing role in a fiscal federalist system, where subnational governments are responsible for financing the nation’s essential physical infrastructure.
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Richard O. Zerbe Jr.

Benefit–cost analysis is at heart a subject of practicality and usefulness. With this in mind, the author has chosen to discuss the most relevant previously published articles. Having explored the theoretical and ethical underpinnings of the subject, the research review then addresses some major policy issues and debates. These include the institutional arrangements through which benefit–cost analyses would be most useful to the policy and decision process, the need for a set of principles and standards to unify benefit–cost analysis methods, the use of general equilibrium analysis and the proper treatment of uncertainty and risk.