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Louise Hauberg Wilhelmsen

The Brussels I Regulation, which ensures the free circulation of judgments within the EU, was recently revised; one of the main issues addressed was whether the Regulation affects the efficient resolution of international commercial disputes through arbitration within the Union. This book provides an in depth examination of the interface between the Regulation and international commercial arbitration. The author demonstrates that the consequences of this interface can encourage the use of delaying tactics, hampering the efficient resolution of international disputes.
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Franco Ferrari and Clayton P. Gillette

This authoritative research review presents and discusses carefully selected scholarly articles that describe and examine the principles of international sales law, as set forth in the United Nations Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods (CISG). These seminal pieces reflect various viewpoints of authors from different countries and legal systems, and offer a range of distinct methodological approaches to legal analysis. The review is an invaluable source of reference, providing the reader with both an international and an interdisciplinary perspective on the CISG and its application.
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Susan Tiefenbrun

This definitive and comprehensive book, with contributions from world-renowned foreign trade zone expert, the late Walter Diamond, provides an up-to-date guide to the free trade zones and subzones in the United States and around the world.
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Gerard McCormack

This is a discerning analysis of international harmonisation efforts for secured credit law and examines the role of globalisation and finance capital in shaping such efforts. Gerard McCormack reveals how an ‘efficient’ law is often seen to increase the availability, and lower the cost, of credit, thereby contributing to international development. He considers whether the most comprehensive international standard – the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law (UNCITRAL) Legislative Guide (2008) – is actually suitable for adoption at the national level. In particular, he examines the hypothesis that American law and lawyers have shaped the content of the Guide to the extent that it is not suitable for translation into other laws.