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Edited by Matthias Haentjens and Bob Wessels

In this timely Handbook, over 30 prominent academics, practitioners and regulators from across the globe provide in-depth insights into an area of law that the recent global financial crisis has placed in the spotlight: bank insolvency law.
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Jay Cullen

This important book discusses the issue of executive compensation in Anglo-American financial markets following the financial crisis. The book begins by contextualizing the problem facing financial institutions in the US and the UK and argues that approaches to government and compensation reform are flawed. It then goes on to offer solutions and suggests that new reforms to executive compensation in financial institutions would be very welcome, despite certain limitations.
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Regulatory Competition in the Internal Market

Comparing Models for Corporate Law, Securities Law and Competition Law

Barbara Gabor

Regulatory competition within Europe and internationally, operates in several fields with different outcomes. This book offers a comparative legal and economic analysis of corporate, securities and competition law, exploring the reasons behind such differences.
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Gerard McCormack

This is a discerning analysis of international harmonisation efforts for secured credit law and examines the role of globalisation and finance capital in shaping such efforts. Gerard McCormack reveals how an ‘efficient’ law is often seen to increase the availability, and lower the cost, of credit, thereby contributing to international development. He considers whether the most comprehensive international standard – the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law (UNCITRAL) Legislative Guide (2008) – is actually suitable for adoption at the national level. In particular, he examines the hypothesis that American law and lawyers have shaped the content of the Guide to the extent that it is not suitable for translation into other laws.