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Law and Evil

The Evolutionary Perspective

Wojciech Załuski

Law and Evil presents an alternative evolutionary picture of man, focusing on the origins and nature of human evil, and demonstrating its useful application in legal-philosophical analyses. Using this representation of human nature, Wojciech Załuski analyses the development of law, which he interprets as moving from evolutionary ethics to genuine ethics, as well as arguing in favour of metaethical realism and ius naturale.
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Just Interests

Victims, Citizens and the Potential for Justice

Robyn Holder

Just Interests: Victims, Citizens and the Potential for Justice contributes to extended conversations about the idea of justice – who has it, who doesn’t and what it means in the everyday setting of criminal justice. It challenges the usual representation of people victimized by violence only as victims, and re-positions them as members of a political community. Departing from conventional approaches that see victims as a problem for law to contain, Robyn Holder draws on democratic principles of inclusion and deliberation to argue for the unique opportunity of criminal justice to enlist the capacity of citizens to rise to the demands of justice in their ordinary lives.
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Nina H.B. Jørgensen

This Companion is a one-stop reference resource on the Phnom Penh based ‘Khmer Rouge tribunal'. It serves as an introduction to the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia, while also exploring some of the Court’s practical and jurisprudential challenges and outcomes. Written by Nina Jørgensen, who has worked as senior adviser in the tribunal’s Pre-Trial and Supreme Court Chambers, the Companion offers both direct insights and academic analysis organized around six themes: legality, structure, proceedings, jurisprudence, legitimacy and legacy. This comprehensive Companion will provide a platform for interested sectors of domestic and international society, to assess the value of the Extraordinary Chambers, both during the tribunal’s lifespan and after it has closed its doors.
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Bengt Lindell

Providing an accessible introduction to the application of multi-criteria analysis in law, this book illustrates how simple additive weighing, a well known method in decision theory, can be used in problem structuring, analysis and decision support for overall assessments and balancing of interests in the context of law.
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Gideon Boas and Pascale Chifflet

This book explores crucial themes in international criminal justice. It starts by answering the searching question: what is international criminal justice? The book then considers the role and impact of politics, history, psychology, terrorism, transitioning society, and even the idea of hope, and the relationship of these themes with how we understand international criminal justice. While addressing some crucial legal questions, International Criminal Justice goes further, drawing on a range of multi-disciplinary thinking.
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Linda E. Carter, Mark Steven Ellis and Charles C. Jalloh

International tribunals need to interface effectively with national jurisdictions, which includes coordination with domestic judicial prosecutions as well as an appreciation for other non-judicial types of transitional justice. In this book, the authors analyze the earlier international tribunals established since the 1990s and the parallel national proceedings for each. In examining the ways in which the ICC can best coordinate with national processes this book considers the ICC’s present interactions with national jurisdictions and the statutory framework of the Rome Statute for interface with national jurisdictions.