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Neil Stephen Lopez and Jose Bienvenido Manuel Biona

Neil Stephen Lopez and Jose Bienvenido Manuel Biona assess cumulative accessibility to healthcare services in Metro Manila, using Google maps. Access to health car provision differs by mode and travel budget, particularly under 100 Philippines Pesos (PhP). Almost half of zones do not have access to a healthcare facility by private car for a travel budget of 100 PhP. Public transport has advantages over private modes at lower travel budgets; and the private car becomes more advantageous at higher budgets. The peripheral areas have high costs of accessing healthcare, and this is where public transport access if often very limited.

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Geert te Boveldt, Imre Keseru and Cathy Macharis

Geert te Boveldt, Imre Keseru and Cathy Macharis discuss the use of greater participatory approaches in transport appraisal, specifically through the application of Competence-based Multi Criteria Analysis (COMCA). This allows the use of multi-actor viewpoints where different actors have varied roles, tasks or levels of responsibility. The Brussels North-South railway corridor is used as a case study, with project options rated against a do-nothing alternative.

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Emilia Smeds

Emilia Smeds considers journeys to school in relation to social practices and the dimensions of material, meaning and competency. This is viewed as a more complete framework for assessing social change than psychological theories which concentrate on attitudes at the individual level. Two schools are analysed, using interviews, in Ealing, West London. The prevalence for driving to school is based on a range of issues, including lack of suitable walking and cycling facilities, space-time constraints on parents’ mobility, poor public transport provision, availability of school choice, and negative meanings such as fear of traffic. Hence the difficulties in moving people away from the use of the private car for journeys to school – they are much more fundamental than changing individual behaviours and very often involve deeper, structural issues.

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Yash Ghai

The chapter explores the role played by civil society in the reform and making of constitutions and the various ways through which participatory processes of constitution making allow for groups hitherto marginalized, to have an active role in the design of their governmental institutions. By focusing on the case of Kenya, the chapter traces the role of civil society and other communities and groups in the making of the 2010 Constitution, especially during the first phase of the process, from the establishment of the Constitution of Kenya Review Commission (CKRC) in late 2000 to the adoption of the draft constitution by the Kenya National Constitutional Conference (“Bomas”) in April 2014. Taking into account both formal and informal aspects of the constitution making process, the chapter aims at examining the various components of a participatory process influenced by an active engagement of civil society, and assess their impact on the process and outcome. It demonstrates how the impact of participation on the constitutional decision maker significantly depends on the effectiveness of the civil society organizations, on the persuasiveness of public submissions, on connectedness to powerful interests, and on the zeal of organizations’ campaign.

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Mark Thomas and Lucy Cradduck

This chapter explains the core role of the moot coach. As with the development or improvement of any skill set, mooting-specific skills are best developed with the assistance and involvement of an informed coach. The authors identify the role of the moot coach in competition mooting, and explain how a moot coach can work to build their own skills to maximise their teams’ written and oral performances.

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Mark Thomas and Lucy Cradduck

This chapter develops a model of the cognitive domain in a Bloom-Krathwohl-style matrix. Building from the specific levels identified by Bloom, and their interrelation with each other, the authors adapt these to the specific context of mooting. Engaging with existing literature and examples from sport, theatre and music, the authors develop a specific model that can be used for developing mooting-specific cognitive skills.

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Christopher Ansell and Martin Bartenberger

This chapter analyses the government decision making and meaning related to the collapse of the investment bank Lehman Brothers in September 2008. We investigate the Lehman Brothers case for evidence of Pragmatist and principle-guided political crisis management. We find that strategic crisis leaders adopted a more principle-guided form of political crisis management in this case than they did in the Bear Stearns case. This is especially true when it comes to the two Pragmatist dimensions of anti-dualism and fallibilism that are largely absent in the Lehman example. While focusing on the Lehman case, we also contrast it with two other important decisions made only days later: the rescue of the insurance company AIG and the rescue of the money market mutual funds. These two decisions again illustrate a more Pragmatist form of political crisis management.

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Edited by Robin Hickman, Beatriz Mella Lira, Moshe Givoni and Karst Geurs

With social inequity in urban spaces becoming an increasing concern in our modern world, The Elgar Companion to Transport, Space and Equity explores the relationships between transport and social equity. Transport systems and infrastructure investment can lead to inequitable travel behaviours, with certain socio-demographic groups using particular parts of the transport system and accessing particular activities and opportunities.
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Edited by David Landau and Hanna Lerner

Recent years have witnessed an explosion of new research on constitution making. Comparative Constitution Making provides an up-to-date overview of this rapidly expanding field.
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Christopher Ansell and Martin Bartenberger

The two previous chapters contrasted the Pragmatist and principle-guided crisis management models during several key decision-making and meaning-making episodes. The analysis found evidence for both models and identified shifts between them as well as hybrid forms that combined them both. This chapter paves the way for future empirical research by introducing and discussing two questions. First, what were the causes of the shift from a Pragmatist approach in the Bear Stearns case to a more principle-guided approach in the Lehman case, followed by the shift back to Pragmatism in the AIG decision? Second, how were elements of both Pragmatist and principle-guided political crisis management combined in the Lehman case? Without providing definitive answers to these questions, this chapter probes these cases for plausible responses.