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Martin Jones

This chapter article builds on the large but dispense body of work concerned with the local state and the role of local government therein. Set within the context of labour market and welfare state restructuring in neoliberalism, it suggests that there is an emerging consensus for a more robust and proactive involvement by local government. The chapter argues that initiatives for reactivating the local state have been deployed and tested in Denmark, with local government playing a central role in socioeconomic governance. It unpacks Denmark's 'welfare-through-work' model—a policy-making system built around negotiated and inclusive systems of regulation and governance—and highlights some of the still relevant lessons for re-engaging local authorities in the UK.

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Isak Svensson

Whether unbiased or biased mediators are the most effective peacemakers in armed conflicts represents a long-running and central debate in mediation research. This chapter explores the role of bias in international mediation occurring in internal armed conflicts, that is, on the violent side of the conflict-to-crisesspectrum. The chapter takes stock of the debate around biased mediation and discusses the current controversies within it. It shows that there are four different theoretical approaches – idealist, realist, bargaining, and emancipatory – that have led to different expectations regarding the role of biased mediation. Focusing primarily on the quantitatively based research on international mediation, the chapter also discusses the research strategies and indicators that have been utilized in previous research for examining biased mediation. Moreover, it presents the current stage of the empirical evidence on biased mediation. Lastly, the chapter identifies some of the main policy implications that emerge from this field of research.

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Jiayao Hu, Ming K. Lim, Kim Hua Tan and Ming-Lang Tseng

The ability to gain valuable business insights can occur through big data management. Sustainable supply chains are replete with data and information due to the many partners in the supply chain in addition to the multiple dimensions of sustainability. The chapter overviews the relationship between big data and sustainable supply chains. The challenges and opportunities are reviewed. A case example in the transportation industry provides additional insights into managing big data for sustainable supply chain management. Directions for future investigation and concerns are also delineated.

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Shannon Kerwin and Alison Doherty

With a focus on volunteer board member role identity, intergenerational board diversity, and contemporary leadership issues, the chapter outlines current trends in theory and research that lead to directions for future investigation regarding board dynamics in nonprofit sport organizations. With regard to role identity, the authorsrecommend the exploration of the salience of identity for board members, and the potential correlates of this influential social phenomenon. Discussing intergenerational diversity, theyhighlight the need to examine the forces, impact, and policies around managing individuals from different generations who serve on nonprofit sport boards. Within contemporary leadership, theyconsider shared, servant, and values-based leadership and identify these as types of leadership that are increasingly relevant in nonprofit sport organizations and thus warrant investigation in this context. Finally, the authorsreflect on the relevance of considering the intersection among these topics, to develop a strong theoretical understanding of board dynamics in non-profit sport organization governance.

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Christos Anagnostopoulos and Mathieu Winand

Team sport charitable foundations are organisational formats that serve as the delivery mechanism for the professional teams’ social responsibility and community engagement. In this organisational setting, however, the boundaries between charitable foundation and ‘parent’ team are frequently illdefined, thereby rendering board dynamics distinctive. Such distinctiveness lies in the fact that the composition of the board consists of members of the ‘parent’ sport team organisation, chief among them often being the owner or chairperson of the team and/or its CEO. The purpose of this chapter is to unpack a specific type of board group dynamic – namely the board–executive relationship – in the context of professional sport teams’ charitable foundations. More specifically, acknowledging that governance is a process-based exercise, the present study examines process elements that can improve the charitable foundations’ perceived performance, that is, trust and ‘exchange currencies’ between thefoundations’ executives/CEOs and the boards. The study examines organisational governance, with an implicit focus on the board’s role on perceived organisational performance.

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Claire A. Dunlop

This chapter introduces the new impulse for public administration scholarship be relevant: the so-called ‘impact agenda’ appearing in academic research audits. We start by providing some background to the impact revolution, explore public administration’s impact credentials, and the various tensions and dilemmas being relevant raises for scholars. After these discussions, we offer some analysis from a unique dataset of public administration impact case studies submitted to the UK’s 2014 Research Excellent Framework (REF). By uncovering the central themes of these studies, we identify critical differences between public administration scholars working in politics departments as opposed to their business school counterparts. More broadly, a bias towards managerial themes is strong with traditional, value-driven research around trust, corruption and transparency marginal concerns. We conclude by discussing what impact implies for the future research agenda in public administration.

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Ian O’Boyle, David Shilbury and Lesley Ferkins

This chapter explores and analyses the growing body of work related to the field of collaborative governance in sporting networks. The focus of the chapter is on the federal model of sport governance that exists in a number of Western nations throughout the world. Alternative models such as the unitary system are detailed before an in-depth examination of key issues and challenges related to collaborative governance ispresented. A depiction of collaborative governance in sport is provided by means ofa figure to guide the reader through the chapter’s content. Trust and leadership emerge as the two dominant themes within the chapter, with particular attention being afforded to issues such as histories of conflict, trustbuilding, transparency, face-to-face dialogue, and leadership roles within these networks. The chapter concludes by pointing to both a way forward for future research and practical implications for sporting networks characterised by the federal model.

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Laura Meade and Adrien Presley

The focus of this chapter is on building the business case for sustainable supply chains. Sustainability, sustainable supply chains and green supply chains are defined and discussed. A recent literature review summarizes the current schools of thought for building the business case for sustainability and how that compares with building the business case for sustainable supply chains. What it means to build a business case is also discussed. Furthermore, a variety of models that have been utilized recently to reflect the various thought processes when making the business case for sustainable supply chains are reviewed, with the authors suggesting a holistic decision-making model for enterprises to use when considering sustainable supply chain improvements. Future research concerns are also summarized.

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Michael Howlett, Ishani Mukherjee and Scott A. Fritzen

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s(IPCC) Fifth Assessment Report argued that organizations are transitioning from adaptation planning to implementation. This chapter therefore focuses on problematizing adaptation implementation processes. Why are plans not implemented or codified through legal instruments? Why are laws not enforced or reversed? What factors determine why some nations or sub-national governments have moved successfully toward the implementation of adaptation policy while others have stalled?And what role do policy and agenda setting dynamics, political positions and political uncertainty play in enabling or constraining implementation?

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Marie-Joëlle Zahar and J. Arthur Boutellis

How do gray zone dynamics affect efforts to mediate negotiated outcomes to armed conflict? Drawing upon the case of Mali, where the UN and Algeria have each attempted to bring about durable peace, the chapter argues that gray zone dynamics complicate such mediation initiatives. They make it difficult to bring actors to the table, to find mutually acceptable solutions, and to coordinate and impart coherence to the often multiple and simultaneous efforts to find mediated solutions. Even as mediation efforts may result in peace agreements – as was the case when Malian actors signed a peace accord in 2015 – gray zone dynamics complicate implementation. They particularly pose challenges for the management of spoilers, particularly where background conditions include terrorism and trafficking. Yet, the temptation to use security responses to address low-level violence and terrorist attacks runs the risk of closing the space for further mediation. The chapter concludes with implications for theory and practice.