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Yussuf Aleem and Jacob Slowik

In this chapter we describe our story and how we came to understand the fundamental strategy to which we attribute our success. We identify this strategy as business niche specialization. We describe how we used business niche specialization to our advantage, why business niche specialization is ideal for independent law firm and career success, and how to pick the right business niche for building a successful law practice. This chapter sets the foundation of the book – the business niche specialization strategy – which supports the remaining chapters’ discussions of other business tactics and practices complementary to this strategy.

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Jerome A. Katz

In corners of academe today one can hear “the business plan is dead,” but is it? This chapter seeks to shine a light on where and when business plans remain not only alive, but central to the achievement of entrepreneurship dreams. To give away the conclusion in advance, those places represent the vast majority of startup situations - among the vast majority of investors, the vast majority of bankers, and the vast majority of professionals. The chapter concludes with some observations on how business plans and feasibility analyses fit into contemporary entrepreneurship pedagogy.

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Simon Duke

Capabilities, both for civilian and military crisis management, have been a core concern of the EU since the birth of CSDP. Although the Member States operate under the principle of a ‘single set of forces’ many of the EU’s members often think first and foremost in terms of their own requirements for national security and defence. This introduces not only issues of subsidiarity, but also the likelihood of duplication of capabilities as well as significant gaps, such as strategic enablers. In spite of evident knowledge of the principal shortcomings, numerous attempts to address them have often proven frustrating. A number of initiatives since the second half of 2016 open the possibility of more joint development and procurement of often expensive platforms and equipment, aided by the prospect of European Commission funding. Against the potential of these initiatives the prospect of Brexit threatens to impose significant capability shortcomings on the EU at the very moment when the Union has moved security and defence to the fore of its attempt to reinvigorate the European project.

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Cheryl Bodnar, Kimble Byrd and Linda Ross

Faculty development programs allow faculty to learn new content and gain insights from like-minded faculty.  This article describes an Innovation and Entrepreneurship Faculty Certificate program that leverages a community of practice model to allow faculty members to integrate content related to entrepreneurial mindset into their classes.  The certificate program takes place during the academic year and covers topics including creativity, ideation, business model canvas, innovation canvas, and teaching resources.  Through a partnership with the Faculty Center this certificate program has been able to provide recognition to faculty members that is valuable as part of their tenure and recontracting process.

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Mireia Estrada Cañamares

The chapter focuses on the interconnections between the CFSP and EU humanitarian aid, two policy areas that often coexist in the Union’s action in crisis situations outside our borders. It reflects on the tension between the CFSP–humanitarian aid nexus and the need to respect the special character of humanitarian aid, a policy that is subject to the principles of humanity, neutrality, impartiality and independence. The chapter also highlights the risks of this nexus from the perspective of the effectiveness of EU humanitarian aid. It furthermore suggests that the quest for coherence, which was relaunched by the Lisbon Treaty reforms, has the potential to reinforce the CFSP–humanitarian aid nexus, adding even more pressure to the independence of humanitarian aid.

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María Augusta León Moreta and Bingyu Liu

This chapter aims to demonstrate how alternative forums that TNCs have to uphold their rights prevent the effective enforcement of environmental decisions at the national and international levels. The chapter addresses the class action lawsuit against Texaco filed by Ecuadorian villagers and indigenous communities in US federal courts, the suit against Chevron-Texaco before Ecuadorian courts, the development of legal procedures before Argentinian and Canadian courts, the impossibility to enforce Ecuadorian judgment in foreign jurisdictions, and the arbitration proceedings instituted by Chevron Corporation and Texaco Oil Company against Ecuador before international courts.

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Anna Masutti and Filippo Tomasello

Air transport is the most regulated sector for safety and security in consideration of its vulnerability. Several regulations have been adopted after the 9/11 attack at European and international level. These provisions have been construed for civil piloted aircraft only. Therefore, no provisions were envisaged for drones used for illegal and criminal activities, including terrorist attacks. However, there are regulations that can be applicable to drones. Today, space systems are vital to enhance, for example, national security, foreign policy, and global economic interests. Drones can be used for improving security of citizens. But there is also the flip side of the coin. Indeed, the misuse of collected data may affect the privacy of individuals and their security; therefore, the guarantee of the privacy right should be included in a wider concept of data protection.

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Paul Castañeda Dower

Productivity in agriculture has been one of the main challenges to economic growth. Since climate change disproportionately affects agriculture and the rural poor, a new set of challenges is emerging. Institutions will influence the economic impact of these changes, but they themselves may be shaped in response. Therefore, institutional analysis is vital for policy design and a better understanding of these pressing global issues. Additionally, the particular nature of agriculture and agricultural organization presents an especially vibrant area to study the interaction between institutions, economic growth and climate change.

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Michael H Lubetsky

This chapter examines the legal definition of charity in common law and civilian legal traditions. The chapter begins with Roman law, outlining the origins of the civilian approach to defining charity for legal purposes. It then considers the reception and treatment of English charity law in the United States of America, and demonstrates that US courts came to recognize the civilian origins of English charity law. Finally, the chapter examines the famous case of Commissioners for Special Purposes of Income Tax v Pemsel, and emphasizes the ways in which that case demanded reflection on the relation of the legal definitions of charity in the English common law and the Scottish hybrid systems. Throughout, the chapter emphasizes that common law and civilian legal traditions share common Roman roots and have interacted for centuries in relation to the legal definition of charity.

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Jennifer L Beard

This chapter begins by considering how charity advocacy for political causes might in the Australian setting serve the important constitutional value of political sovereignty; it concludes that charity advocacy does serve that value, but questions whether charities should be subsidized to carry out such advocacy except where the advocacy serves charitable purposes. The chapter also considers the topic of charities participating in election campaigning in Australia. It suggests that the rule in Australia’s Charities Act that identifies election campaigning as a disqualifying purpose may fall foul of the implied freedom of political communication in the Australian Constitution.